Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Spynie Palace
EXTERNAL ID
PC_STAND_CATH_034
PLACENAME
Elgin
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
MORAYSHIRE
DATE OF IMAGE
1791
PERIOD
1790s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness
ASSET ID
30030
KEYWORDS
cathedrals
palaces
ruins
Spynie Palace

This illustration of Spynie Palace, in Moray, is unsigned but dated 1791.

From 1206, the Bishops of Moray had their seat and Cathedral at Spynie, to the north-east of Elgin, although earlier bishops had established their cathedral at Kineddar or Birnie, both near to Elgin. The Cathedral was moved to Elgin itself in July 1224, although the Palace remained at Spynie. The ruins of the Palace are now in the care of Historic Scotland.

The bishops controlled navigation on the Loch of Spynie, and ran a port there until the encroachment of sand closed the access to the sea in about 1480. The Bishops drained part of the loch and turned it into good agricultural land. Spynie Palace lay above the loch. In September 1562 Mary Queen of Scots visited Spynie.

The oldest surviving masonry, the enclosure walls, date from the 14th century. In the later 15th century Bishop David built the great tower, now named 'David's Tower'. By 1500 the great hall had been erected.

Following the Reformation, which started in 1560, Bishop Patrick was permitted to remain in office until his death in 1573. During the subsequent hundred years or so Bishops were twice reintroduced, and the last Bishop to live in the area was Bishop William Hay, who was deprived of his office in 1689 for refusing to read the proclamation about William and Mary as joint sovereigns. He went to live in Inverness with his son-in-law, John Cuthbert of Castlehill. His memorial plaque, originally in the Old High Church, can now be found in the Lady Chapel of St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness.

In 1851 Bishop Robert Eden became Bishop of the joined Dioceses of Moray and Ross. He decided that Elgin was not a very practical centre for the joint Diocese, and this led to the building of St Andrew's Cathedral in Inverness for the Scottish Episcopal Church. In 1864 Caithness was also joined to the Diocese, and the current diocese is that of Moray, Ross and Caithness, with a Diocesan Centre at Arpafeelie in the Black Isle.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Spynie Palace

MORAYSHIRE

1790s

cathedrals; palaces; ruins

Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness

Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness

This illustration of Spynie Palace, in Moray, is unsigned but dated 1791. <br /> <br /> From 1206, the Bishops of Moray had their seat and Cathedral at Spynie, to the north-east of Elgin, although earlier bishops had established their cathedral at Kineddar or Birnie, both near to Elgin. The Cathedral was moved to Elgin itself in July 1224, although the Palace remained at Spynie. The ruins of the Palace are now in the care of Historic Scotland.<br /> <br /> The bishops controlled navigation on the Loch of Spynie, and ran a port there until the encroachment of sand closed the access to the sea in about 1480. The Bishops drained part of the loch and turned it into good agricultural land. Spynie Palace lay above the loch. In September 1562 Mary Queen of Scots visited Spynie.<br /> <br /> The oldest surviving masonry, the enclosure walls, date from the 14th century. In the later 15th century Bishop David built the great tower, now named 'David's Tower'. By 1500 the great hall had been erected.<br /> <br /> Following the Reformation, which started in 1560, Bishop Patrick was permitted to remain in office until his death in 1573. During the subsequent hundred years or so Bishops were twice reintroduced, and the last Bishop to live in the area was Bishop William Hay, who was deprived of his office in 1689 for refusing to read the proclamation about William and Mary as joint sovereigns. He went to live in Inverness with his son-in-law, John Cuthbert of Castlehill. His memorial plaque, originally in the Old High Church, can now be found in the Lady Chapel of St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness.<br /> <br /> In 1851 Bishop Robert Eden became Bishop of the joined Dioceses of Moray and Ross. He decided that Elgin was not a very practical centre for the joint Diocese, and this led to the building of St Andrew's Cathedral in Inverness for the Scottish Episcopal Church. In 1864 Caithness was also joined to the Diocese, and the current diocese is that of Moray, Ross and Caithness, with a Diocesan Centre at Arpafeelie in the Black Isle.