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TITLE
Bishop John Leslie (or Lesley)
EXTERNAL ID
PC_STAND_CATH_044
DATE OF IMAGE
1697
PERIOD
1690s
CREATOR
Pieter Stevens à Gunst
SOURCE
Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness
ASSET ID
30040
KEYWORDS
clergy
clergymen
bishops
portraits
Bishop John Leslie (or Lesley)

This engraving, dating from 1697, is based on a portrait of Leslie by Adriaen van der Werff (1659-1722), an accomplished Dutch painter of portraits and erotic, devotional and mythological scenes. The engraver was Pieter Stevens à Gunst/van Gunst (1659-1724), a Dutch draughtsman and copperplate engraver.

Bishop Lesley, born in 1527, is said to be the son, perhaps illegitimate, of Gavin Lesley, Rector of Kingussie. He was educated at the University of Aberdeen. He became first an acolyte, then a canon and prebendary of the Cathedral Church of Aberdeen. He became a Doctor of Laws in France in 1553. In 1558 he took holy orders and became prebend of Oyne in Aberdeenshire.

In 1561 he was present in Edinburgh at the famous disputation where he took opposite sides from John Knox. In the same year he was sent as part of the deputation to bring the young Mary Queen of Scots from France to Scotland. He was then appointed as a Privy Councillor and Professor of Canon Law at King's College, Aberdeen, becoming Bishop of Ross in 1565, although unable to carry out the duties properly, due to the Reformation and attitudes to Church government.

He remained a steadfast friend of Mary Queen of Scots, and appeared at the English court before Queen Elizabeth to complain about the injustices done to her. He was soon imprisoned in the Tower of London, where he compiled material for his history of Scotland.

Freed in 1573, he moved to Rome, where, in 1578, he published his history as De Origine, Moribus, et Rebus Gestis Scotorum. A year later he was in France and became suffragan and vicar-general of the archbishopric of Rouen. Following two further spells in prison, he became Bishop of Coutances in Normandy, until such time as he could peaceably take possession of the Bishopric of Ross. This never happened, and he retired to a monastery near Brussels, where he died in 1596.

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Bishop John Leslie (or Lesley)

1690s

clergy; clergymen; bishops; portraits

Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness

Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness

This engraving, dating from 1697, is based on a portrait of Leslie by Adriaen van der Werff (1659-1722), an accomplished Dutch painter of portraits and erotic, devotional and mythological scenes. The engraver was Pieter Stevens à Gunst/van Gunst (1659-1724), a Dutch draughtsman and copperplate engraver.<br /> <br /> Bishop Lesley, born in 1527, is said to be the son, perhaps illegitimate, of Gavin Lesley, Rector of Kingussie. He was educated at the University of Aberdeen. He became first an acolyte, then a canon and prebendary of the Cathedral Church of Aberdeen. He became a Doctor of Laws in France in 1553. In 1558 he took holy orders and became prebend of Oyne in Aberdeenshire.<br /> <br /> In 1561 he was present in Edinburgh at the famous disputation where he took opposite sides from John Knox. In the same year he was sent as part of the deputation to bring the young Mary Queen of Scots from France to Scotland. He was then appointed as a Privy Councillor and Professor of Canon Law at King's College, Aberdeen, becoming Bishop of Ross in 1565, although unable to carry out the duties properly, due to the Reformation and attitudes to Church government.<br /> <br /> He remained a steadfast friend of Mary Queen of Scots, and appeared at the English court before Queen Elizabeth to complain about the injustices done to her. He was soon imprisoned in the Tower of London, where he compiled material for his history of Scotland.<br /> <br /> Freed in 1573, he moved to Rome, where, in 1578, he published his history as De Origine, Moribus, et Rebus Gestis Scotorum. A year later he was in France and became suffragan and vicar-general of the archbishopric of Rouen. Following two further spells in prison, he became Bishop of Coutances in Normandy, until such time as he could peaceably take possession of the Bishopric of Ross. This never happened, and he retired to a monastery near Brussels, where he died in 1596.