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TITLE
Vue de la Ville d'Elgin (View of the Town of Elgin)
EXTERNAL ID
PC_STAND_CATH_50
PLACENAME
Elgin
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
MORAYSHIRE
PERIOD
1690s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness
ASSET ID
30046
KEYWORDS
landscapes
townscapes
Vue de la Ville d'Elgin (View of the Town of Elgin)

The illustration seems to have been taken from the ridge of higher land to the north-west of the town. A bend of the River Lossie is in the foreground. The ruins of Elgin Cathedral can be seen on the left, marked by the larger tower, with two adjacent smaller ones. This engraving reflects the state of the building in the mid to late 17th century, after the collapse of the roof, but before the collapse of the main tower. The Castle Hill is on the far right. In the centre of the town is the roofed tower of the Church of St Giles (demolished 1826).

The origin of this engraving is not known, but it seems to be based on a view drawn by John Slezer for Theatrum Scotiae, published from 1693.

Elgin Cathedral was established in 1224 as the Cathedral of the Diocese of Moray. Prior to this the Cathedral was at Spynie, to the north-east of Elgin. The cathedral was badly damaged in a raid by the Wolf of Badenoch in 1390.

After the Reformation the local people used the Parish Church of St Giles, and the Cathedral was abandoned. An Act of Parliament of 1567 authorised the removal of the lead from the Cathedral roof to pay the costs of maintaining the army. However the ship taking the lead to Holland capsized and sank in Aberdeen harbour.

In December 1637 part of the roof collapsed, and on Easter Sunday 1711 the central tower collapsed, and demolished the nave. Thereafter the ruin was plundered by local people for stone. Work to stabilise the structure did not start until 1809. From 1824, John Shanks, a local shoemaker, started clearing the debris. Major work on maintenance did not start until the 1930s. The building is now under the care of Historic Scotland.

Within the Scottish Episcopal Church, the Diocese of Moray was combined with that of Ross in 1851. Caithness was added in 1864. The first Bishop of the joined dioceses was Robert Eden, and he decided that Inverness was a much more central place than Elgin. This led to the building of St Andrew's Cathedral in Inverness between 1866 and 1869, and this building serves as the Cathedral for what is now the Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness.

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Vue de la Ville d'Elgin (View of the Town of Elgin)

MORAYSHIRE

1690s

landscapes; townscapes

Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness

Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness

The illustration seems to have been taken from the ridge of higher land to the north-west of the town. A bend of the River Lossie is in the foreground. The ruins of Elgin Cathedral can be seen on the left, marked by the larger tower, with two adjacent smaller ones. This engraving reflects the state of the building in the mid to late 17th century, after the collapse of the roof, but before the collapse of the main tower. The Castle Hill is on the far right. In the centre of the town is the roofed tower of the Church of St Giles (demolished 1826).<br /> <br /> The origin of this engraving is not known, but it seems to be based on a view drawn by John Slezer for Theatrum Scotiae, published from 1693.<br /> <br /> Elgin Cathedral was established in 1224 as the Cathedral of the Diocese of Moray. Prior to this the Cathedral was at Spynie, to the north-east of Elgin. The cathedral was badly damaged in a raid by the Wolf of Badenoch in 1390.<br /> <br /> After the Reformation the local people used the Parish Church of St Giles, and the Cathedral was abandoned. An Act of Parliament of 1567 authorised the removal of the lead from the Cathedral roof to pay the costs of maintaining the army. However the ship taking the lead to Holland capsized and sank in Aberdeen harbour.<br /> <br /> In December 1637 part of the roof collapsed, and on Easter Sunday 1711 the central tower collapsed, and demolished the nave. Thereafter the ruin was plundered by local people for stone. Work to stabilise the structure did not start until 1809. From 1824, John Shanks, a local shoemaker, started clearing the debris. Major work on maintenance did not start until the 1930s. The building is now under the care of Historic Scotland.<br /> <br /> Within the Scottish Episcopal Church, the Diocese of Moray was combined with that of Ross in 1851. Caithness was added in 1864. The first Bishop of the joined dioceses was Robert Eden, and he decided that Inverness was a much more central place than Elgin. This led to the building of St Andrew's Cathedral in Inverness between 1866 and 1869, and this building serves as the Cathedral for what is now the Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness.