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TITLE
Channerie, Ville du Comte de Ross (Chanonry, town in the County of Ross)
EXTERNAL ID
PC_STAND_CATH_53
PLACENAME
Fortrose / Rosemarkie
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
PERIOD
1690s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness
ASSET ID
30049
KEYWORDS
landscapes
townscapes
Channerie, Ville du Comte de Ross (Chanonry, town in the County of Ross)

This view seems to have been taken from the higher land north-west of the present-day Fortrose. Across the Moray Firth can be seen Ardersier (or Campbelltown as it was also known from the mid-17th century). The origins of these engravings are not known, but both seem to be based on a view drawn by John Slezer for Theatrum Scotiae, published from 1693.

Fortrose and Rosemarkie lie on either side of a promontory that juts out from the Black Isle on the north side of the Moray Firth, representing the position of part of a moraine deposited at the time of the melting of the ice sheet at the end of the last phase of the Ice Age.

From 1124 Rosemarkie was the seat of the Bishop of Ross (whose diocese included Cromarty). The bishop's seat was later transferred to nearby Fortrose, where the cathedral was completed in 1485. Both towns became Royal Burghs in 1590. The name 'Chanonry' comes from the residences of the Canons who were associated with the Cathedral, and who conducted the daily services of the church.

In the mid-17th century Cromwell's troops plundered the Cathedral for stone to build a fort at Inverness. The vaulted south aisle, with bell-tower, and a detached chapter house (used as the tollbooth of Fortrose after the Reformation) remain. These fragments, though modest in scale, display considerable architectural refinement, and are in the care of Historic Scotland.

By the 14th century a ferry plied from Chanonry Point across the Moray Firth to Ardersier. The ferry carried pilgrims, including James IV, on their way to St Duthac's Shrine at Tain. In 1894 Fortrose was linked by a branch railway to Muir of Ord improving accessibility. The railway and the Chanonry Point ferry had both disappeared by the 1960s, but Fortrose continued to grow, especially after the opening of the Kessock Bridge in 1982.

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Channerie, Ville du Comte de Ross (Chanonry, town in the County of Ross)

ROSS: Rosemarkie

1690s

landscapes; townscapes

Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness

Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness

This view seems to have been taken from the higher land north-west of the present-day Fortrose. Across the Moray Firth can be seen Ardersier (or Campbelltown as it was also known from the mid-17th century). The origins of these engravings are not known, but both seem to be based on a view drawn by John Slezer for Theatrum Scotiae, published from 1693.<br /> <br /> Fortrose and Rosemarkie lie on either side of a promontory that juts out from the Black Isle on the north side of the Moray Firth, representing the position of part of a moraine deposited at the time of the melting of the ice sheet at the end of the last phase of the Ice Age.<br /> <br /> From 1124 Rosemarkie was the seat of the Bishop of Ross (whose diocese included Cromarty). The bishop's seat was later transferred to nearby Fortrose, where the cathedral was completed in 1485. Both towns became Royal Burghs in 1590. The name 'Chanonry' comes from the residences of the Canons who were associated with the Cathedral, and who conducted the daily services of the church.<br /> <br /> In the mid-17th century Cromwell's troops plundered the Cathedral for stone to build a fort at Inverness. The vaulted south aisle, with bell-tower, and a detached chapter house (used as the tollbooth of Fortrose after the Reformation) remain. These fragments, though modest in scale, display considerable architectural refinement, and are in the care of Historic Scotland.<br /> <br /> By the 14th century a ferry plied from Chanonry Point across the Moray Firth to Ardersier. The ferry carried pilgrims, including James IV, on their way to St Duthac's Shrine at Tain. In 1894 Fortrose was linked by a branch railway to Muir of Ord improving accessibility. The railway and the Chanonry Point ferry had both disappeared by the 1960s, but Fortrose continued to grow, especially after the opening of the Kessock Bridge in 1982.