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TITLE
Chanonry Point Lighthouse
EXTERNAL ID
PC_TAYLOR_BLACKISLE_DEC067
PLACENAME
Chanonry Point
DISTRICT
Fortrose
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
DATE OF IMAGE
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Andrew Taylor
SOURCE
Andrew Taylor
ASSET ID
30061
KEYWORDS
postcards
peninsulas
moraine
lighthouses
ferreis
pilgrims
inns
boats
witchcraft
dolphins
golf
Chanonry Point Lighthouse

Chanonry Point is at the end of a narrow peninsula, Chanonry Ness, which projects a mile in to the Moray Firth. The peninsula is believed to be a moraine, a pile of boulders and rocks, deposited during the ice age. In the distance is the village of Ardersier on the Inverness-shire coast.

The lighthouse was built by Alan Stevenson in 1846 and has Egyptian features on the door and cottages. The cottages are now private houses.

Since early times a ferry plied between Chanonry Point and Ardersier, the shortest crossing of the Moray Firth. The ferry carried pilgrims, including James IV, on their way to St Duthac's Shrine at Tain. Regular crossings stopped in 1932 when the last regular ferryman died. An inn which stood on the point has been converted in to a house.

In the nineteenth century steam-vessels carrying goods and passengers stopped at Canonry Point.

Near the lighthouse is a memorial stone to the Brahan Seer who was accused of witchcraft by the Countess of Seaforth in 1660 and burned to death here in spiked barrel of tar.

The Ness is now known for more gentle pursuits. The Point is a favourite place to watch bottle nose dolphins and golf has been played on Chanonry Ness links since the early 18th century.

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Chanonry Point Lighthouse

ROSS: Rosemarkie

2000s

postcards; peninsulas; moraine; lighthouses; ferreis; pilgrims; inns; boats; witchcraft; dolphins; golf

Andrew Taylor

Chanonry Point is at the end of a narrow peninsula, Chanonry Ness, which projects a mile in to the Moray Firth. The peninsula is believed to be a moraine, a pile of boulders and rocks, deposited during the ice age. In the distance is the village of Ardersier on the Inverness-shire coast.<br /> <br /> The lighthouse was built by Alan Stevenson in 1846 and has Egyptian features on the door and cottages. The cottages are now private houses.<br /> <br /> Since early times a ferry plied between Chanonry Point and Ardersier, the shortest crossing of the Moray Firth. The ferry carried pilgrims, including James IV, on their way to St Duthac's Shrine at Tain. Regular crossings stopped in 1932 when the last regular ferryman died. An inn which stood on the point has been converted in to a house.<br /> <br /> In the nineteenth century steam-vessels carrying goods and passengers stopped at Canonry Point.<br /> <br /> Near the lighthouse is a memorial stone to the Brahan Seer who was accused of witchcraft by the Countess of Seaforth in 1660 and burned to death here in spiked barrel of tar.<br /> <br /> The Ness is now known for more gentle pursuits. The Point is a favourite place to watch bottle nose dolphins and golf has been played on Chanonry Ness links since the early 18th century.