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TITLE
Ben Bhraggie from Golspie
EXTERNAL ID
PC_WGORDON3_008_014
PLACENAME
Golspie
DISTRICT
Golspie, Rogart and Lairg
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Golspie
SOURCE
W Gordon
ASSET ID
30325
KEYWORDS
hills
George Granville Leveson-Gower
Duke of Sutherland
Highland Clearances
clearances
Ben Bhraggie from Golspie

This postcard shows Ben Bhraggie in Eastern Sutherland. Standing at 394 metres, the hill overlooks Loch Fleet and the village of Golspie. Situated at the top of Ben Bhraggie is a statue of George Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Duke of Sutherland.

At the beginning of the 19th century the Duke of Sutherland had the largest private estate in Europe - approximately 1.5 million acres. He believed that the land could not support his tenants in the long term and so he initiated the resettling of thousands of families to the coasts to make way for sheep. The Sutherland clearances were particularly ruthless so it is ironic that the plinth reads that the statue was erected by 'a mourning and grateful tenantry' to 'a judicious, kind and liberal landlord'.

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Ben Bhraggie from Golspie

SUTHERLAND: Golspie

hills; George Granville Leveson-Gower; Duke of Sutherland; Highland Clearances; clearances

W Gordon

Winnie Gordon (photographs)

This postcard shows Ben Bhraggie in Eastern Sutherland. Standing at 394 metres, the hill overlooks Loch Fleet and the village of Golspie. Situated at the top of Ben Bhraggie is a statue of George Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Duke of Sutherland. <br /> <br /> At the beginning of the 19th century the Duke of Sutherland had the largest private estate in Europe - approximately 1.5 million acres. He believed that the land could not support his tenants in the long term and so he initiated the resettling of thousands of families to the coasts to make way for sheep. The Sutherland clearances were particularly ruthless so it is ironic that the plinth reads that the statue was erected by 'a mourning and grateful tenantry' to 'a judicious, kind and liberal landlord'.