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TITLE
Carrbridge Floods, 1923 - Work on small bridge and embankment which had been washed away
EXTERNAL ID
PC_WHARTON_FLOODS_035
PLACENAME
Carrbridge
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Duthil and Rothiemurchus
DATE OF IMAGE
1923
PERIOD
1920s
CREATOR
William Paterson
SOURCE
Mary Anne Wharton
ASSET ID
30476
KEYWORDS
floods
flooding
disasters
Carrbridge Floods, 1923 - Work on small bridge and embankment which had been washed away

This photograph shows workers repairing an embankment and small railway bridge near Carrbridge.

On 8 July 1923 severe thunderstorms led to acute flooding in the Carrbridge district of Inverness-shire. This resulted in the collapse of six rail and road bridges, the levelling of nearly half a mile of railway embankments and the destruction of existing flood protection works.

Sir Robert McAlpine and Sons were contracted to carry out repairs and had 250 men working on site, living in hastily erected huts. The workforce included labourers, blacksmiths, carpenters and mechanics as well as clerical and other ancillary staff. Passenger and goods traffic was routed through Grantown and Forres while the repairs were carried out.

The Carrbridge to Inverness road re-opened on 15 July but the railway didn't re-open until 31 August.

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Carrbridge Floods, 1923 - Work on small bridge and embankment which had been washed away

INVERNESS: Duthil and Rothiemurchus

1920s

floods; flooding; disasters

Mary Anne Wharton

Carrbridge Floods, 1923

This photograph shows workers repairing an embankment and small railway bridge near Carrbridge.<br /> <br /> On 8 July 1923 severe thunderstorms led to acute flooding in the Carrbridge district of Inverness-shire. This resulted in the collapse of six rail and road bridges, the levelling of nearly half a mile of railway embankments and the destruction of existing flood protection works.<br /> <br /> Sir Robert McAlpine and Sons were contracted to carry out repairs and had 250 men working on site, living in hastily erected huts. The workforce included labourers, blacksmiths, carpenters and mechanics as well as clerical and other ancillary staff. Passenger and goods traffic was routed through Grantown and Forres while the repairs were carried out.<br /> <br /> The Carrbridge to Inverness road re-opened on 15 July but the railway didn't re-open until 31 August.