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TITLE
Side School, Achlyness
EXTERNAL ID
PC_WMORRISON_088
PLACENAME
Achlyness
DISTRICT
Eddrachillis and Durness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Eddrachillis
CREATOR
Willie Morrison
SOURCE
Willie Morrison
ASSET ID
30571
KEYWORDS
corrugated iron
Side School, Achlyness

This building, made of corrugated metal, was once a side school at Achlyness. Achlyness is a crofting township stretched out at the head of Loch Inchard near Rhiconich in Sutherland.

Before the Education (Scotland) Act, 1872, which required local authorities to provide education paid for by local taxation, most schools were administered by the Church. In the Highlands, some parishes were very large, and a second school, known as a 'side school' was provided. Teachers in the side schools were paid less and the curriculum consisted only of reading, writing and arithmetic. Other schools, with better-paid teachers, might offer additional subjects, including history and geography.

The following extract is from the Am Baile schools competition in 2003. It was written by a pupil - Ruarigh - of Kinlochbervie Primary School.

'The first schools in the area were Side Schools. These were for one or two families that lived in each area. The Side Schools were at Skerrecha, Achlyness, Badcall Inchard, Ardmore, Polin and Balchirck. The staff at these were not qualified teachers. Once or twice a year a teacher from one of the larger schools in the area (Oldshore or Inshegra) came to look at the children's work. All of the school work was done on slates with chalk. Only the best work was written out on paper which was seen as a luxury. So when the teachers came round, there could not be much work to look at. There was no transport to the side schools and the children never really met children from other Side Schools. The pupils also had to carry peat to school each day to keep the fire going in the classroom. When local roads improved, transport to schools was easier. The arrival of electric power in 1955 and improved transport led to the Side Schools closing. Achlyness Side School today is still in reasonable condition. There can't be many Side Schools left in Sutherland. Being close to the main road, I think Archlyness Side School would make a good museum of Education.'

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Side School, Achlyness

SUTHERLAND: Eddrachillis

corrugated iron

Willie Morrison

Willie Morrison Archive

This building, made of corrugated metal, was once a side school at Achlyness. Achlyness is a crofting township stretched out at the head of Loch Inchard near Rhiconich in Sutherland.<br /> <br /> Before the Education (Scotland) Act, 1872, which required local authorities to provide education paid for by local taxation, most schools were administered by the Church. In the Highlands, some parishes were very large, and a second school, known as a 'side school' was provided. Teachers in the side schools were paid less and the curriculum consisted only of reading, writing and arithmetic. Other schools, with better-paid teachers, might offer additional subjects, including history and geography.<br /> <br /> The following extract is from the Am Baile schools competition in 2003. It was written by a pupil - Ruarigh - of Kinlochbervie Primary School.<br /> <br /> 'The first schools in the area were Side Schools. These were for one or two families that lived in each area. The Side Schools were at Skerrecha, Achlyness, Badcall Inchard, Ardmore, Polin and Balchirck. The staff at these were not qualified teachers. Once or twice a year a teacher from one of the larger schools in the area (Oldshore or Inshegra) came to look at the children's work. All of the school work was done on slates with chalk. Only the best work was written out on paper which was seen as a luxury. So when the teachers came round, there could not be much work to look at. There was no transport to the side schools and the children never really met children from other Side Schools. The pupils also had to carry peat to school each day to keep the fire going in the classroom. When local roads improved, transport to schools was easier. The arrival of electric power in 1955 and improved transport led to the Side Schools closing. Achlyness Side School today is still in reasonable condition. There can't be many Side Schools left in Sutherland. Being close to the main road, I think Archlyness Side School would make a good museum of Education.'