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TITLE
Fishing implements
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_0950237000_P001
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF IMAGE
1989
PERIOD
19c; 20c
CREATOR
Johan Sutherland
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30733
KEYWORDS
fishing
tools
implements
knives
lines
creels
methods
zoomable

This page illustrates some of the fishing implements used in the Easter Ross seaboard villages.

A 'plàtach' is a rush mat woven from reeds and old fishing line. It was used to place the fishing line on while it was being baited or hauled back in.

A 'kype' was a navvy's spade. It had a flat base with a curved lip and a flat wooden handle about 5ft long. It was used to dig up lug worms.

A 'sand eel hook' was used for collecting sand eels (or sanels). Sand eels were found just under the surface of the sand and were easy to gather.

A 'cleap' was a gaff hook used to land large fish while a 'ripper' was a lead or stone weight with four large hooks hanging around it. It was used to catch cod by ripping it upwards.

'Lugworms', 'mussels' and 'limpets' were all used as bait. Lugworms were gathered from June to August and poisoned the fingers so it was not uncommon to see women with their fingers bandaged during that time. Limpets were used as bait all year round and were often used with mussels for catching cod between April and May. Mussels were also used all year round.

A 'line creel' was tapered at one end so that the baited line could be fed out easily. A 'croich' was a simple frame or creel stand for holding the creel with the baited line in it.

A 'sprattan' was used for lifting limpets from rocks. It had a well-padded handle. A 'guttack' was a sharp pointed knife.

These illustrations were taken from 'Down to the Sea' by Jessie MacDonald and Anne Gordon, illustrated by Johan Sutherland. The book was published in Dingwall by the Ross and Cromarty Heritage Society in 1989

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Fishing implements

ROSS

19c; 20c

fishing; tools; implements; knives; lines; creels; methods; zoomable

Highland Libraries

This page illustrates some of the fishing implements used in the Easter Ross seaboard villages. <br /> <br /> A 'plàtach' is a rush mat woven from reeds and old fishing line. It was used to place the fishing line on while it was being baited or hauled back in.<br /> <br /> A 'kype' was a navvy's spade. It had a flat base with a curved lip and a flat wooden handle about 5ft long. It was used to dig up lug worms. <br /> <br /> A 'sand eel hook' was used for collecting sand eels (or sanels). Sand eels were found just under the surface of the sand and were easy to gather.<br /> <br /> A 'cleap' was a gaff hook used to land large fish while a 'ripper' was a lead or stone weight with four large hooks hanging around it. It was used to catch cod by ripping it upwards.<br /> <br /> 'Lugworms', 'mussels' and 'limpets' were all used as bait. Lugworms were gathered from June to August and poisoned the fingers so it was not uncommon to see women with their fingers bandaged during that time. Limpets were used as bait all year round and were often used with mussels for catching cod between April and May. Mussels were also used all year round.<br /> <br /> A 'line creel' was tapered at one end so that the baited line could be fed out easily. A 'croich' was a simple frame or creel stand for holding the creel with the baited line in it.<br /> <br /> A 'sprattan' was used for lifting limpets from rocks. It had a well-padded handle. A 'guttack' was a sharp pointed knife.<br /> <br /> These illustrations were taken from 'Down to the Sea' by Jessie MacDonald and Anne Gordon, illustrated by Johan Sutherland. The book was published in Dingwall by the Ross and Cromarty Heritage Society in 1989