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TITLE
Typical cottage furniture in the Seaboard villages of Easter Ross
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_0950237000_P004
DATE OF IMAGE
1989
PERIOD
19c
CREATOR
Johan Sutherland
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30736
KEYWORDS
furniture
beds
fires
cookers
cradles
cribs
cots
houses
buildings
cottages
zoomable images

This page illustrates the furniture of a typical 'but n' ben' house (two rooms). One room of the house was the well-kept parlour which was only used on special occasions. The other served as kitchen, dining room and bedroom. The fireplace in these houses would now be considered a fire hazard. It was set against an inner wall with a wooden canopy overhanging the fire place. This wooden hood was attached to the chimney by a wooden flue. The fire was on the floor and was flanked by two hobs of rough stone and clay. A chain and crook (hook) was suspended from the flue to hold the cooking pot. The fireplace was later developed by moving the fire off the floor by means of a simple iron grate.

The dresser was usually placed next to the bed. It was made of white scrubbed wood and had the family plates and bowls arranged on the shelves. Below the shelves were two drawers and two presses (cupboards) where the housewife kept utensils and food.
The beds were typically box beds. These were made of wood and enclosed on all sides and above. In some cases the wooden doors were taken off and replaced with curtains. Box beds were the only means of privacy in houses where the whole family shared one room. The cradle was common in most houses. It had rockers and a hood. The knobs were used to fit string to hold the baby down. A mother could rock the cradle with her foot while she was doing other jobs.

These illustrations were taken from 'Down to the Sea' by Jessie MacDonald and Anne Gordon, illustrated by Johan Sutherland. The book was published in Dingwall by the Ross and Cromarty Heritage Society in 1989

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Typical cottage furniture in the Seaboard villages of Easter Ross

19c

furniture; beds; fires; cookers; cradles; cribs; cots; houses; buildings; cottages; zoomable images

Highland Libraries

This page illustrates the furniture of a typical 'but n' ben' house (two rooms). One room of the house was the well-kept parlour which was only used on special occasions. The other served as kitchen, dining room and bedroom. The fireplace in these houses would now be considered a fire hazard. It was set against an inner wall with a wooden canopy overhanging the fire place. This wooden hood was attached to the chimney by a wooden flue. The fire was on the floor and was flanked by two hobs of rough stone and clay. A chain and crook (hook) was suspended from the flue to hold the cooking pot. The fireplace was later developed by moving the fire off the floor by means of a simple iron grate.<br /> <br /> The dresser was usually placed next to the bed. It was made of white scrubbed wood and had the family plates and bowls arranged on the shelves. Below the shelves were two drawers and two presses (cupboards) where the housewife kept utensils and food.<br /> The beds were typically box beds. These were made of wood and enclosed on all sides and above. In some cases the wooden doors were taken off and replaced with curtains. Box beds were the only means of privacy in houses where the whole family shared one room. The cradle was common in most houses. It had rockers and a hood. The knobs were used to fit string to hold the baby down. A mother could rock the cradle with her foot while she was doing other jobs.<br /> <br /> These illustrations were taken from 'Down to the Sea' by Jessie MacDonald and Anne Gordon, illustrated by Johan Sutherland. The book was published in Dingwall by the Ross and Cromarty Heritage Society in 1989