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TITLE
Shandwick
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_0950237000_P007
PLACENAME
Shandwick
DISTRICT
Fearn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Nigg
DATE OF IMAGE
1989
PERIOD
19c
CREATOR
Johan Sutherland
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30739
KEYWORDS
towns
villages
plans
maps
seaboard
Pictish stones
fishing
zoomable

Shandwick is one of the seaboard villages of Easter Ross. The others are Balintore and Hilton. Shandwick began as a small fishing settlement but it grew with the development of the herring industry and with the clearances which forced people to the coasts. By the 1880s, Shandwick had over 60 fishermen. The name comes from the Norse 'sand vik' which means sand bay. Shandwick is most famous for the large Pictish stone which stands on a hill behind the village. The Shandwick Stone, or Clach a' Charridh, is an impressive Class II Pictish cross slab.

Park of Balintore, towards the top of the plan, is a single row of houses separating Shandwick and Balintore.

These illustrations were taken from 'Down to the Sea' by Jessie MacDonald and Anne Gordon, illustrated by Johan Sutherland. The book was published in Dingwall by the Ross and Cromarty Heritage Society in 1989

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Shandwick

ROSS: Nigg

19c

towns; villages; plans; maps; seaboard; Pictish stones; fishing; zoomable

Highland Libraries

Shandwick is one of the seaboard villages of Easter Ross. The others are Balintore and Hilton. Shandwick began as a small fishing settlement but it grew with the development of the herring industry and with the clearances which forced people to the coasts. By the 1880s, Shandwick had over 60 fishermen. The name comes from the Norse 'sand vik' which means sand bay. Shandwick is most famous for the large Pictish stone which stands on a hill behind the village. The Shandwick Stone, or Clach a' Charridh, is an impressive Class II Pictish cross slab.<br /> <br /> Park of Balintore, towards the top of the plan, is a single row of houses separating Shandwick and Balintore.<br /> <br /> These illustrations were taken from 'Down to the Sea' by Jessie MacDonald and Anne Gordon, illustrated by Johan Sutherland. The book was published in Dingwall by the Ross and Cromarty Heritage Society in 1989