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TITLE
William, Duke of Cumberland
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_21_P001
DATE OF IMAGE
1748
PERIOD
1740s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30745
KEYWORDS
Duke of Cumberland
Culloden
Jacobites
battles
Bonnie Prince Charlie
clan system
William Augustus Hanover
armies
William, Duke of Cumberland

William Augustus Hanover, Duke of Cumberland (1721-1765) was the second son of George II. He was created Duke of Cumberland in 1726 but he also held the titles of Marquis of Berkhamstead, Earl of Kennington, Viscount Trematon and Baron of Alderney. He was sent to Scotland to stop the Jacobite Rising in 1745. On the 16th April 1746 Cumberland's army faced the Jacobite forces at Culloden. The battle was over in less than an hour with the Jacobites defeated. Any chance of a Stuart succession to the throne ended at Culloden.

After the battle the Duke of Cumberland's orders were 'no quarter given' (i.e. no mercy to be shown). This is said to have been written on the back of a 9 of Diamonds playing card, still known as the 'curse of Scotland'. Jacobites were pursued and executed, the wounded were shot, homes were burned and cattle were driven off. This earned the Duke the nickname 'Butcher Cumberland'.

Cumberland set about the systematic destruction of the clan system and the Highland way of life. His military career ended in disgrace when he surrendered to the French during the Seven Years War. He died of a brain clot in 1765.

Fort Augustus, a fort on Loch Ness, was named after the Duke, and the surrounding village takes the same name.

This portrait was taken from 'An Impartial History of the Late Rebellion in 1745', by S Boyse

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William, Duke of Cumberland

1740s

Duke of Cumberland; Culloden; Jacobites; battles; Bonnie Prince Charlie; clan system; William Augustus Hanover; armies

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

William Augustus Hanover, Duke of Cumberland (1721-1765) was the second son of George II. He was created Duke of Cumberland in 1726 but he also held the titles of Marquis of Berkhamstead, Earl of Kennington, Viscount Trematon and Baron of Alderney. He was sent to Scotland to stop the Jacobite Rising in 1745. On the 16th April 1746 Cumberland's army faced the Jacobite forces at Culloden. The battle was over in less than an hour with the Jacobites defeated. Any chance of a Stuart succession to the throne ended at Culloden. <br /> <br /> After the battle the Duke of Cumberland's orders were 'no quarter given' (i.e. no mercy to be shown). This is said to have been written on the back of a 9 of Diamonds playing card, still known as the 'curse of Scotland'. Jacobites were pursued and executed, the wounded were shot, homes were burned and cattle were driven off. This earned the Duke the nickname 'Butcher Cumberland'. <br /> <br /> Cumberland set about the systematic destruction of the clan system and the Highland way of life. His military career ended in disgrace when he surrendered to the French during the Seven Years War. He died of a brain clot in 1765. <br /> <br /> Fort Augustus, a fort on Loch Ness, was named after the Duke, and the surrounding village takes the same name.<br /> <br /> This portrait was taken from 'An Impartial History of the Late Rebellion in 1745', by S Boyse