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TITLE
Plan of the Battle of Falkirk
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_21_P134
PLACENAME
Falkirk
DATE OF IMAGE
1748
PERIOD
1740s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30747
KEYWORDS
Falkirk
battles
plans
clans
Jacobites
Hanovarians
Bonnie Prince Charlie
Charles Edward Stuart
Henry Hawley
zoomable

On their way back north from Derby, Bonnie Prince Charlie's Jacobite army met Lieutenant General Hawley's Government army at Falkirk. Hawley, who replaced Sir John Cope after Prestonpans, had a low opinion of the 'Highland militia' and did not consider the Jacobites to be a threat.

When the two armies met, the Jacobites had a number of advantages. They were on higher and better ground which forced the government troops to attack uphill and to lose their artillery in swampy ground. The government troops were also having to attack into the wind and rain that was behind the Jacobite army.

Hawley tried to break the Jacobite line using a cavalry charge believing a tale that Highlanders were afraid of horses. The cavalry charge failed to have the desired effect and, although the battle was fairly unorganised, the Jacobites defeated Hawley's army, killing about 420 soldiers while only losing about 50 of their own.

This plan was taken from 'An Impartial History of the Late Rebellion in 1745', by S Boyse

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Plan of the Battle of Falkirk

1740s

Falkirk; battles; plans; clans; Jacobites; Hanovarians; Bonnie Prince Charlie; Charles Edward Stuart; Henry Hawley; zoomable

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (maps)

On their way back north from Derby, Bonnie Prince Charlie's Jacobite army met Lieutenant General Hawley's Government army at Falkirk. Hawley, who replaced Sir John Cope after Prestonpans, had a low opinion of the 'Highland militia' and did not consider the Jacobites to be a threat.<br /> <br /> When the two armies met, the Jacobites had a number of advantages. They were on higher and better ground which forced the government troops to attack uphill and to lose their artillery in swampy ground. The government troops were also having to attack into the wind and rain that was behind the Jacobite army. <br /> <br /> Hawley tried to break the Jacobite line using a cavalry charge believing a tale that Highlanders were afraid of horses. The cavalry charge failed to have the desired effect and, although the battle was fairly unorganised, the Jacobites defeated Hawley's army, killing about 420 soldiers while only losing about 50 of their own.<br /> <br /> This plan was taken from 'An Impartial History of the Late Rebellion in 1745', by S Boyse