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TITLE
Tain - Voices From Their Past (1 of 13)
EXTERNAL ID
TDM_DONNIEMACLEOD_01
PLACENAME
Tain
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Tain
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Donnie MacLeod
SOURCE
Tain & District Museum
ASSET ID
3075
KEYWORDS
audios
Second World War
World War 2

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This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Tain and District Museum. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The gentleman being interviewed in this extract is Donnie MacLeod.

'My name is Donnie MacLeod and I was born in Cromarty Gardens in Tain, in 1929. Going on to the war years my first memory is being with my grandfather down at the railway station when the first troops to arrive in Tain came off the train. They were the 5th Camerons. They formed up in the square and marched along Shore Road towards which we now know as Fraser Ross's furniture store but at that time was their, or had been commandeered at that time by the military, as mess halls and ablutions and stores.

The next - my next memory is of them parading and drilling in Cromarty Gardens - and going up and down Cromarty Gardens and being drilled by their sergeant. One little story about that was, we as kids used to copy them on the pavement standing behind them, and the sergeant wasn't very pleased with what they were doing on this particular day, and he told them in his usual nice military language exactly what he thought of them, and finished off by saying, 'These kids behind you can do it better than you.'

They also used to drill up in the top of Cromarty Gardens, in the field there, that's where the academy is today, and they used to do the rifle drill and the bayonet practice there. Another memory I have is of the bugler in the morning sounding reveille and all the troops assembling at the foot of Cromarty Gardens, outside the Girl Guides' hut as we know it and marching down to the ablutions. There was a lot of them staying in civilian houses at that time because the camps hadn't been built - it was right at the beginning of the war - and anybody that had a spare room was obliged to take in troops.'

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Tain - Voices From Their Past (1 of 13)

ROSS: Tain

2000s

audios; Second World War; World War 2;

Tain & District Museum

Voices From Their Past - Tain

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Tain and District Museum. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The gentleman being interviewed in this extract is Donnie MacLeod.<br /> <br /> 'My name is Donnie MacLeod and I was born in Cromarty Gardens in Tain, in 1929. Going on to the war years my first memory is being with my grandfather down at the railway station when the first troops to arrive in Tain came off the train. They were the 5th Camerons. They formed up in the square and marched along Shore Road towards which we now know as Fraser Ross's furniture store but at that time was their, or had been commandeered at that time by the military, as mess halls and ablutions and stores.<br /> <br /> The next - my next memory is of them parading and drilling in Cromarty Gardens - and going up and down Cromarty Gardens and being drilled by their sergeant. One little story about that was, we as kids used to copy them on the pavement standing behind them, and the sergeant wasn't very pleased with what they were doing on this particular day, and he told them in his usual nice military language exactly what he thought of them, and finished off by saying, 'These kids behind you can do it better than you.' <br /> <br /> They also used to drill up in the top of Cromarty Gardens, in the field there, that's where the academy is today, and they used to do the rifle drill and the bayonet practice there. Another memory I have is of the bugler in the morning sounding reveille and all the troops assembling at the foot of Cromarty Gardens, outside the Girl Guides' hut as we know it and marching down to the ablutions. There was a lot of them staying in civilian houses at that time because the camps hadn't been built - it was right at the beginning of the war - and anybody that had a spare room was obliged to take in troops.'