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TITLE
Massacre of Glen Nevis Camerons
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_39_P223
PLACENAME
Glen Nevis
DISTRICT
Lochaber
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmallie
DATE OF IMAGE
1898
CREATOR
William Lockhart Bogle
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30781
KEYWORDS
clans
disputes
Massacre of Glen Nevis Camerons

One of the longest-running and bloodiest feuds in the history of the Highlands was between the Clan Cameron and the Clan Chattan. Legend has it that in the late 14th century MacSorlie, the chief of the Glen Nevis Camerons, was keen to make peace with their enemies and invited them to a meeting to discuss a treaty. The evening went well and, after the "deoch an dorus" (parting drink) MacSorlie ordered his piper to play a pibroch in honour of his guests. To the horror of the chief the piper played the war pibroch of Clan Cameron, "Thigibh an so, chlannabh na'n con's gheibh sibh feoil" ("Come here, children of the dogs, and shall get flesh") - a grave insult to the Clan Chattan who left vowing vengeance. They returned later that night and massacred almost all the Camerons.

This illustration is from 'Loyal Lochaber. Historical Genealogical and Traditionary' by W Drummond Norie, Glasgow, 1898

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Massacre of Glen Nevis Camerons

INVERNESS: Kilmallie

clans; disputes

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

One of the longest-running and bloodiest feuds in the history of the Highlands was between the Clan Cameron and the Clan Chattan. Legend has it that in the late 14th century MacSorlie, the chief of the Glen Nevis Camerons, was keen to make peace with their enemies and invited them to a meeting to discuss a treaty. The evening went well and, after the "deoch an dorus" (parting drink) MacSorlie ordered his piper to play a pibroch in honour of his guests. To the horror of the chief the piper played the war pibroch of Clan Cameron, "Thigibh an so, chlannabh na'n con's gheibh sibh feoil" ("Come here, children of the dogs, and shall get flesh") - a grave insult to the Clan Chattan who left vowing vengeance. They returned later that night and massacred almost all the Camerons.<br /> <br /> This illustration is from 'Loyal Lochaber. Historical Genealogical and Traditionary' by W Drummond Norie, Glasgow, 1898