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TITLE
MacNab
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P003
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30821
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuarts
James Logan Clanbook
MacNab

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Clan MacNab, a branch of the Siol Alpine family, is termed in Gaelic Clann-an-Aba ('children of the abbot'). The MacNabs claim descent from the abbots of Glendochart, where the clan lands were for several centuries. They were friendly with their neighbours the MacDougalls and joined them and the Comyns against Robert the Bruce, as a result of which they lost many of their lands. However, Gilbert MacNab managed to obtain a charter for his Barony of Bovain lands from Bruce's son, King David II, in 1336.

Finlay, the 4th chief, expanded the clan's possessions towards the end of the 15th century, but in 1552 Finlay, the 6th chief, mortgaged a great portion of his lands to Campbell of Glenorchy. In 1606 Finlay, the 7th chief, signed a bond of manrent with his cousin, Lachlan MacKinnon of Strathardle, which set out their common ancestry. This chief carried on a deadly feud with the Neishes.

Under their chief Iain Mion ('Smooth John') the MacNabs supported the Stewarts during the Civil Wars and served under Montrose. They lost their lands to the Campbells at that time but regained some of them after the Restoration in 1660. During the Jacobite risings the clan sided with the Stewarts but the 15th chief was a major in the Hanoverian army and was captured at the Battle of Prestonpans in 1745.

One of the most colourful of the MacNab chiefs was Francis, the 12th chief, subject of a famous portrait by Sir Henry Raeburn at the beginning of the 18th century. When he died in 1816 he left considerable debts and no direct heir

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MacNab

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuarts; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The Clan MacNab, a branch of the Siol Alpine family, is termed in Gaelic Clann-an-Aba ('children of the abbot'). The MacNabs claim descent from the abbots of Glendochart, where the clan lands were for several centuries. They were friendly with their neighbours the MacDougalls and joined them and the Comyns against Robert the Bruce, as a result of which they lost many of their lands. However, Gilbert MacNab managed to obtain a charter for his Barony of Bovain lands from Bruce's son, King David II, in 1336.<br /> <br /> Finlay, the 4th chief, expanded the clan's possessions towards the end of the 15th century, but in 1552 Finlay, the 6th chief, mortgaged a great portion of his lands to Campbell of Glenorchy. In 1606 Finlay, the 7th chief, signed a bond of manrent with his cousin, Lachlan MacKinnon of Strathardle, which set out their common ancestry. This chief carried on a deadly feud with the Neishes.<br /> <br /> Under their chief Iain Mion ('Smooth John') the MacNabs supported the Stewarts during the Civil Wars and served under Montrose. They lost their lands to the Campbells at that time but regained some of them after the Restoration in 1660. During the Jacobite risings the clan sided with the Stewarts but the 15th chief was a major in the Hanoverian army and was captured at the Battle of Prestonpans in 1745.<br /> <br /> One of the most colourful of the MacNab chiefs was Francis, the 12th chief, subject of a famous portrait by Sir Henry Raeburn at the beginning of the 18th century. When he died in 1816 he left considerable debts and no direct heir