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TITLE
MacArthur
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P006
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30824
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
James Logan Clanbook
MacArthur

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Clan MacArthur is of ancient origin, as is expressed in the old Gaelic proverb, 'There is nothing older, unless the hills, MacArthur and the devil.' The clan is claimed by some to be the senior branch of the Campbell clan and held the chiefship until the 15th century.

The MacArthurs supported Robert the Bruce, who rewarded them with Argyll lands forfeited by the MacDougalls and with the Captaincy of the Castle of Dunstaffnage. The clan remained powerful until 1427 when King James I, in an attempt to establish his own authority, had the chief, Iain MacArthur, beheaded along with a number of others. Thereafter, the power of the clan declined. The Campbell clan became predominant and claimed for themselves the chiefship.

MacArthurs held lands by Loch Awe, and were also found in Glendochart and Glenfalloch, while others held lands in Islay where they were represented by the MacArthurs of Proaig. The Islay MacArthurs were pipers and armourers to the Islay MacDonalds, and another family in Skye, who had studied under the legendary MacCrimmons, were hereditary pipers to the MacDonalds of the Isles.

A great number of MacArthurs emigrated from Scotland in the years following Culloden. In 1790, Colonel John MacArthur of the family of Strachur went with the 102nd Regiment to New South Wales, where he introduced sheep and founded the Australian wool industry. He and his two sons were also pioneers of the Australian wine industry. Another MacArthur went to America. His grandson was General Douglas MacArthur, commander of the Pacific in World War 2

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MacArthur

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The Clan MacArthur is of ancient origin, as is expressed in the old Gaelic proverb, 'There is nothing older, unless the hills, MacArthur and the devil.' The clan is claimed by some to be the senior branch of the Campbell clan and held the chiefship until the 15th century. <br /> <br /> The MacArthurs supported Robert the Bruce, who rewarded them with Argyll lands forfeited by the MacDougalls and with the Captaincy of the Castle of Dunstaffnage. The clan remained powerful until 1427 when King James I, in an attempt to establish his own authority, had the chief, Iain MacArthur, beheaded along with a number of others. Thereafter, the power of the clan declined. The Campbell clan became predominant and claimed for themselves the chiefship.<br /> <br /> MacArthurs held lands by Loch Awe, and were also found in Glendochart and Glenfalloch, while others held lands in Islay where they were represented by the MacArthurs of Proaig. The Islay MacArthurs were pipers and armourers to the Islay MacDonalds, and another family in Skye, who had studied under the legendary MacCrimmons, were hereditary pipers to the MacDonalds of the Isles.<br /> <br /> A great number of MacArthurs emigrated from Scotland in the years following Culloden. In 1790, Colonel John MacArthur of the family of Strachur went with the 102nd Regiment to New South Wales, where he introduced sheep and founded the Australian wool industry. He and his two sons were also pioneers of the Australian wine industry. Another MacArthur went to America. His grandson was General Douglas MacArthur, commander of the Pacific in World War 2