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TITLE
Rose
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P008
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30826
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuart
James Logan Clanbook
Rose

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Rose family may have been of Norman origin. What is certain is that they acquired lands in the district of Nairn in the 12th century. In 1219 Hugh Rose of Geddes was witness to the foundation charter of Beauly Priory. His son Hugh acquired the lands of Kilravock by marriage and took the name of Rose of Kilravock. In 1390 the family charters and records were destroyed when Elgin Cathedral was burned by the Wolf of Badenoch, but in 1431 John Rose of Kilravock obtained a fresh charter for all the clan lands. His son Hugh built the old tower of Kilravock in 1460 and in 1474 Kilravock was erected into a barony.

Hugh, 10th of Kilravock, who was taken prisoner at the Battle of Pinkie in 1547, had a distinguished career. Among other offices he held, he was Constable of Inverness Castle and sheriff-principal of Inverness. He managed to live peaceably with his neighbours through a turbulent period in Scottish history and died at the age of ninety in 1597.

The Roses supported the Reformation and were sympathetic to the Covenanters. During the Jacobite risings they were loyal to the government. When Prince Charles Edward Stewart visited Kilravock shortly before the Battle of Culloden, the loyalty of the Roses was not called into question. Hugh, 15th of Kilravock, voted against the Union of 1707, but was one of the commissioners to represent Scotland in the first British parliament.

Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Rose, twenty-fourth Baron of Kilravock, had a distinguished military career. When he died in 1946, he was succeeded by his daughter, who remains in residence at Kilravock Castle to this day

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Rose

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuart; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The Rose family may have been of Norman origin. What is certain is that they acquired lands in the district of Nairn in the 12th century. In 1219 Hugh Rose of Geddes was witness to the foundation charter of Beauly Priory. His son Hugh acquired the lands of Kilravock by marriage and took the name of Rose of Kilravock. In 1390 the family charters and records were destroyed when Elgin Cathedral was burned by the Wolf of Badenoch, but in 1431 John Rose of Kilravock obtained a fresh charter for all the clan lands. His son Hugh built the old tower of Kilravock in 1460 and in 1474 Kilravock was erected into a barony. <br /> <br /> Hugh, 10th of Kilravock, who was taken prisoner at the Battle of Pinkie in 1547, had a distinguished career. Among other offices he held, he was Constable of Inverness Castle and sheriff-principal of Inverness. He managed to live peaceably with his neighbours through a turbulent period in Scottish history and died at the age of ninety in 1597.<br /> <br /> The Roses supported the Reformation and were sympathetic to the Covenanters. During the Jacobite risings they were loyal to the government. When Prince Charles Edward Stewart visited Kilravock shortly before the Battle of Culloden, the loyalty of the Roses was not called into question. Hugh, 15th of Kilravock, voted against the Union of 1707, but was one of the commissioners to represent Scotland in the first British parliament.<br /> <br /> Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Rose, twenty-fourth Baron of Kilravock, had a distinguished military career. When he died in 1946, he was succeeded by his daughter, who remains in residence at Kilravock Castle to this day