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TITLE
Cumin/Cumming
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P010
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30828
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Cummings
James Logan Clanbook
Cumin/Cumming

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Cummings claim descent from a Norman nobleman by the name of Comyn, believed to have taken his name from the town of Comines in northern France. There were Comyns in Northumberland in the 12th and 13th centuries. One of these is thought to have come north to Scotland and obtained lands in the county of Roxburgh, where one Comyn is found settled during the reign of David I. He was made Chancellor of Scotland in 1133.

A later descendant married the Countess of Buchan in 1210 and became Earl of Buchan. His son became Earl of Menteith and acquired the Lordship of Badenoch. A notable figure in this clan was the 'Black Comyn', one of the six guardians of Scotland during the minority of the Maid of Norway and later a contender for the Scottish throne. He married John Balliol's sister and their son John was known as 'Red Comyn'. This John supported Balliol against Robert the Bruce and was stabbed to death by Bruce in the church at Dumfries in 1306. When Robert the Bruce became king the following month, he rewarded his friends at the expense of his enemies and the Comyns lost land and titles. However, a branch of the clan acquired Altyre in Moray and the Cummings of Altyre came to occupy the principal position in the clan.

In 1657 Robert Cumming of Altyre married Lucy, daughter of Sir Ludovick Gordon of Gordonstoun, and when the last Sir William Gordon of Gordonstoun died more than a century later, Alexander Cumming of Altyre assumed the name and arms of Gordon of Gordonstoun and was created a baronet in 1804. Later generations adopted the name Gordon-Cumming

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Cumin/Cumming

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Cummings; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The Cummings claim descent from a Norman nobleman by the name of Comyn, believed to have taken his name from the town of Comines in northern France. There were Comyns in Northumberland in the 12th and 13th centuries. One of these is thought to have come north to Scotland and obtained lands in the county of Roxburgh, where one Comyn is found settled during the reign of David I. He was made Chancellor of Scotland in 1133.<br /> <br /> A later descendant married the Countess of Buchan in 1210 and became Earl of Buchan. His son became Earl of Menteith and acquired the Lordship of Badenoch. A notable figure in this clan was the 'Black Comyn', one of the six guardians of Scotland during the minority of the Maid of Norway and later a contender for the Scottish throne. He married John Balliol's sister and their son John was known as 'Red Comyn'. This John supported Balliol against Robert the Bruce and was stabbed to death by Bruce in the church at Dumfries in 1306. When Robert the Bruce became king the following month, he rewarded his friends at the expense of his enemies and the Comyns lost land and titles. However, a branch of the clan acquired Altyre in Moray and the Cummings of Altyre came to occupy the principal position in the clan.<br /> <br /> In 1657 Robert Cumming of Altyre married Lucy, daughter of Sir Ludovick Gordon of Gordonstoun, and when the last Sir William Gordon of Gordonstoun died more than a century later, Alexander Cumming of Altyre assumed the name and arms of Gordon of Gordonstoun and was created a baronet in 1804. Later generations adopted the name Gordon-Cumming