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TITLE
MacBean (or MacBain)
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P012
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30830
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
James Logan Clanbook
MacBean (or MacBain)

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The exact origin of the Clan MacBean is uncertain. They are said to have moved from Lochaber with an heiress of the Clan Chattan and to have settled in east Inverness-shire, but others describe them as a Moray clan akin to the MacBeaths. They certainly had early connections with the Mackintoshes of the Clan Chattan confederation. Myles MacBean was a strong supporter of Mackintosh who fought for Robert the Bruce against the Red Comyn and at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411 the MacBeans suffered heavy losses fighting for Mackintosh. The principal family were the MacBeans of Kinchyle and they signed a number of important agreements with Clan Chattan in 1609, 1664 and 1756.

The MacBeans enjoy a reputation for their fighting skills and they distinguished themselves at the Battle of Culloden. Gillies MacBean, filling a breach in a wall, killed fourteen Hanoverian soldiers before being killed himself. Some MacBeans considered themselves to be part of the Camerons and fought at Culloden with Cameron of Lochiel. Another Gillies MacBean is said to have helped the wounded Lochiel to safety.

Later, when Highlanders fought in the British Army, one William MacBean rose from the rank of private soldier in the 93rd Sutherland Highlanders to become a major-general in command of the regiment. He won the Victoria Cross for single-handedly killing eleven of the enemy at Lucknow in 1858. Major Forbes MacBean of the Gordon Highlanders gained the D.S.O. (Distinguished Service Order) for brave conduct at the taking of the heights of Dargai in 1897

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MacBean (or MacBain)

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The exact origin of the Clan MacBean is uncertain. They are said to have moved from Lochaber with an heiress of the Clan Chattan and to have settled in east Inverness-shire, but others describe them as a Moray clan akin to the MacBeaths. They certainly had early connections with the Mackintoshes of the Clan Chattan confederation. Myles MacBean was a strong supporter of Mackintosh who fought for Robert the Bruce against the Red Comyn and at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411 the MacBeans suffered heavy losses fighting for Mackintosh. The principal family were the MacBeans of Kinchyle and they signed a number of important agreements with Clan Chattan in 1609, 1664 and 1756.<br /> <br /> The MacBeans enjoy a reputation for their fighting skills and they distinguished themselves at the Battle of Culloden. Gillies MacBean, filling a breach in a wall, killed fourteen Hanoverian soldiers before being killed himself. Some MacBeans considered themselves to be part of the Camerons and fought at Culloden with Cameron of Lochiel. Another Gillies MacBean is said to have helped the wounded Lochiel to safety.<br /> <br /> Later, when Highlanders fought in the British Army, one William MacBean rose from the rank of private soldier in the 93rd Sutherland Highlanders to become a major-general in command of the regiment. He won the Victoria Cross for single-handedly killing eleven of the enemy at Lucknow in 1858. Major Forbes MacBean of the Gordon Highlanders gained the D.S.O. (Distinguished Service Order) for brave conduct at the taking of the heights of Dargai in 1897