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TITLE
MacNicol
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P013
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30831
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Statistical Accounts
James Logan Clanbook
MacNicol

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

In the article on Assynt in the old Statistical Account, Rev William Mackenzie refers to one Mackrycul and notes that he is reputed to be the man from whom are descended the MacNicols, Nicols, and Nicolsons. Mackrycul has been identified as the Gregall mentioned in the genealogy of the MacNicols in the manuscript of 1450. Mackrycul or MacNicol held that part of the coast of Coygach which is known as Ullapool.

About the beginning of the 14th century, the family of the MacNicol chief ended with an heiress who married Torquil Macleod of Lewis and the lands of Assynt passed to the Lewis Macleods. The Clan MacNicol appear to have moved to Skye and the lands of Scorrybreac near Portree were in possession of MacNicols or Nicolsons for several centuries. In the Middle Ages, the Nicolsons followed the MacDonald Lords of the Isles and probably sat on their council. After the collapse of the Lordship of the Isles, the Nicolsons followed the MacDonalds of Sleat. The Rev Donald Nicolson, chief of the Scorrybreac family at the end of the 17th century, was minister of Trotternish for over thirty years. He resigned his charge in 1696 only because of his opposition to Presbyterianism, he himself being a staunch Episcopalian.

In the 19th century the Skye MacNicols were badly affected by the Clearances. The chief was forced to leave Scorrybreac and emigrated to New Zealand; his line continues in Australia. Many Nicolson clansmen also sought refuge in emigration.

MacNicols are also numerous in Argyll and the name Nicolson is found scattered throughout Scotland. In the 19th century Alexander Morison Nicolson became a successful shipbuilder in China and bequeathed a considerable amount of money to found the Nicolson Institute in his native Stornoway

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MacNicol

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Statistical Accounts; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> In the article on Assynt in the old Statistical Account, Rev William Mackenzie refers to one Mackrycul and notes that he is reputed to be the man from whom are descended the MacNicols, Nicols, and Nicolsons. Mackrycul has been identified as the Gregall mentioned in the genealogy of the MacNicols in the manuscript of 1450. Mackrycul or MacNicol held that part of the coast of Coygach which is known as Ullapool. <br /> <br /> About the beginning of the 14th century, the family of the MacNicol chief ended with an heiress who married Torquil Macleod of Lewis and the lands of Assynt passed to the Lewis Macleods. The Clan MacNicol appear to have moved to Skye and the lands of Scorrybreac near Portree were in possession of MacNicols or Nicolsons for several centuries. In the Middle Ages, the Nicolsons followed the MacDonald Lords of the Isles and probably sat on their council. After the collapse of the Lordship of the Isles, the Nicolsons followed the MacDonalds of Sleat. The Rev Donald Nicolson, chief of the Scorrybreac family at the end of the 17th century, was minister of Trotternish for over thirty years. He resigned his charge in 1696 only because of his opposition to Presbyterianism, he himself being a staunch Episcopalian. <br /> <br /> In the 19th century the Skye MacNicols were badly affected by the Clearances. The chief was forced to leave Scorrybreac and emigrated to New Zealand; his line continues in Australia. Many Nicolson clansmen also sought refuge in emigration. <br /> <br /> MacNicols are also numerous in Argyll and the name Nicolson is found scattered throughout Scotland. In the 19th century Alexander Morison Nicolson became a successful shipbuilder in China and bequeathed a considerable amount of money to found the Nicolson Institute in his native Stornoway