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TITLE
MacLeod
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P014
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30832
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuarts
James Logan Clanbook
MacLeod

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Clan MacLeod is descended from Leod, son of Olav the Black, whose brother was King of Man and the Isles. This Leod is said to have had two sons, Tormod and Torquil, from whom descend the two main branches of the clan. The Siol Tormod includes the MacLeods of Glenelg, Harris and Dunvegan, while the MacLeods of Lewis, Waternish and Assynt belong to the Siol Torquil.

The Siol Tormod supported Bruce in the War of Independence and Tormod's grandson, Malcolm, received a charter from David II granting him lands in Glenelg. The MacLeods frequently opposed the powerful MacDonalds but supported the Lord of the Isles at Harlaw in 1411. Although the earlier chiefs were styled 'of Glenelg', it is with Skye that this branch of the clan became principally associated. They acquired much of that island and Dunvegan became the clan seat. One of the most distinguished of their chiefs was Alasdair Crotach, the 'Hump-back', who built the Fairy Tower at Dunvegan and twice unfurled the Fairy Flag. Another notable chief was Ruaraidh Mor, who was knighted by James VI and whose horn is preserved at Dunvegan. He continued the work of Alasdair Crotach, establishing Dunvegan as the cultural centre of the isles.

The Siol Torquil held Lewis and later acquired the barony of Assynt and other lands in Raasay, Waternish and Gairloch. They disputed the chiefship of the clan with the Siol Tormod. A later Torquil assisted Donald Dubh MacDonald in his rebellion to obtain the forfeited Lordship of the Isles. When his attempt failed, the estates of the MacLeods were forfeited, but were restored five years later.

In the 16th century the Siol Torquil were involved in a succession of feuds with neighbouring clans, and between members of their own clan. However, in the early 17th century the main line of the Lewis MacLeods became extinct, and the chiefship of this branch passed to the MacLeods of Raasay. In the end the Siol Torquil was forced to accept the ascendancy of the Siol Tormod.

The MacLeods supported Charles I and Charles II and fought at Worcester in 1651, when they lost many men. They rose again in 1715 for the Stewarts but their chief did not support Prince Charles in 1745, although some of the MacLeods of Raasay did. Because the chief at Dunvegan rebuffed the prince, the Hanoverian government spared the MacLeod lands in the aftermath of Culloden

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MacLeod

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuarts; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The Clan MacLeod is descended from Leod, son of Olav the Black, whose brother was King of Man and the Isles. This Leod is said to have had two sons, Tormod and Torquil, from whom descend the two main branches of the clan. The Siol Tormod includes the MacLeods of Glenelg, Harris and Dunvegan, while the MacLeods of Lewis, Waternish and Assynt belong to the Siol Torquil.<br /> <br /> The Siol Tormod supported Bruce in the War of Independence and Tormod's grandson, Malcolm, received a charter from David II granting him lands in Glenelg. The MacLeods frequently opposed the powerful MacDonalds but supported the Lord of the Isles at Harlaw in 1411. Although the earlier chiefs were styled 'of Glenelg', it is with Skye that this branch of the clan became principally associated. They acquired much of that island and Dunvegan became the clan seat. One of the most distinguished of their chiefs was Alasdair Crotach, the 'Hump-back', who built the Fairy Tower at Dunvegan and twice unfurled the Fairy Flag. Another notable chief was Ruaraidh Mor, who was knighted by James VI and whose horn is preserved at Dunvegan. He continued the work of Alasdair Crotach, establishing Dunvegan as the cultural centre of the isles. <br /> <br /> The Siol Torquil held Lewis and later acquired the barony of Assynt and other lands in Raasay, Waternish and Gairloch. They disputed the chiefship of the clan with the Siol Tormod. A later Torquil assisted Donald Dubh MacDonald in his rebellion to obtain the forfeited Lordship of the Isles. When his attempt failed, the estates of the MacLeods were forfeited, but were restored five years later.<br /> <br /> In the 16th century the Siol Torquil were involved in a succession of feuds with neighbouring clans, and between members of their own clan. However, in the early 17th century the main line of the Lewis MacLeods became extinct, and the chiefship of this branch passed to the MacLeods of Raasay. In the end the Siol Torquil was forced to accept the ascendancy of the Siol Tormod.<br /> <br /> The MacLeods supported Charles I and Charles II and fought at Worcester in 1651, when they lost many men. They rose again in 1715 for the Stewarts but their chief did not support Prince Charles in 1745, although some of the MacLeods of Raasay did. Because the chief at Dunvegan rebuffed the prince, the Hanoverian government spared the MacLeod lands in the aftermath of Culloden