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TITLE
MacKintosh/MacIntosh
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P015
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30833
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Clan Chattan
James Logan Clanbook
MacKintosh/MacIntosh

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The name MacIntosh derives from Mac-an-Toiseach and means 'son of the chief'. The founder of the clan is said to be Shaw, second son of Duncan MacDuff, Earl of Fife, of the royal house of Dalriada. Shaw helped Malcom IV suppress a rebellion in Moray in 1160 and for his efforts received lands in Petty and was made Constable of Inverness Castle. In 1291 Angus, the 6th MacIntosh chief, married Eva, heiress of Clan Chattan in Lochaber. The Clan Chattan developed into a loose confederation of clans led by the MacIntosh chiefs, although their right to chiefship was sometimes challenged by the Macphersons.

The MacIntoshes supported Robert the Bruce, particularly in fighting against the Comyns. They were also involved in feuds with the Earls of Moray and Huntly, and the clans Cameron, MacDonell of Keppoch, and Gordon. They fought for Montrose in support of Charles I and remained loyal to the Jacobite cause in 1715 when they fought under Brigadier MacIntosh of Borlum. After the defeat of that uprising, many MacIntoshes were transported to America. When Prince Charles came to Scotland in 1745, the clan chief was serving in a government regiment but his wife raised men for the prince's army. Lady Anne was responsible for the Rout of Moy when 1500 government troops were deceived into flight by a handful of her retainers. However, the MacIntoshes suffered badly at Culloden and in its aftermath.

In 1938, following the death of the 28th Chief, the chiefships of Clan MacIntosh and Clan Chattan were separated. The present seat of the MacIntosh chief is Moy Hall near Inverness

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MacKintosh/MacIntosh

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Clan Chattan; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The name MacIntosh derives from Mac-an-Toiseach and means 'son of the chief'. The founder of the clan is said to be Shaw, second son of Duncan MacDuff, Earl of Fife, of the royal house of Dalriada. Shaw helped Malcom IV suppress a rebellion in Moray in 1160 and for his efforts received lands in Petty and was made Constable of Inverness Castle. In 1291 Angus, the 6th MacIntosh chief, married Eva, heiress of Clan Chattan in Lochaber. The Clan Chattan developed into a loose confederation of clans led by the MacIntosh chiefs, although their right to chiefship was sometimes challenged by the Macphersons. <br /> <br /> The MacIntoshes supported Robert the Bruce, particularly in fighting against the Comyns. They were also involved in feuds with the Earls of Moray and Huntly, and the clans Cameron, MacDonell of Keppoch, and Gordon. They fought for Montrose in support of Charles I and remained loyal to the Jacobite cause in 1715 when they fought under Brigadier MacIntosh of Borlum. After the defeat of that uprising, many MacIntoshes were transported to America. When Prince Charles came to Scotland in 1745, the clan chief was serving in a government regiment but his wife raised men for the prince's army. Lady Anne was responsible for the Rout of Moy when 1500 government troops were deceived into flight by a handful of her retainers. However, the MacIntoshes suffered badly at Culloden and in its aftermath. <br /> <br /> In 1938, following the death of the 28th Chief, the chiefships of Clan MacIntosh and Clan Chattan were separated. The present seat of the MacIntosh chief is Moy Hall near Inverness