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TITLE
MacLaren (or MacLaurin)
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P016
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30834
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuarts
Jacobite
Jacobites
James Logan Clanbook
MacLaren (or MacLaurin)

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

One traditional account of the Clan MacLaren claims they are descended from Lorn, son of Erc, who landed in Argyll in A.D. 503. Whether or not this is true, the MacLarens are recorded as owning lands in Balquhidder and Strathearn in the 12th century. The Ragman Roll of 1296 lists three names identified as belonging to the clan: Maurice of Tyrie, Conan of Balquhidder and Laurin of Ardveche in Strathearn.

In the 14th century, when the Crown annexed the Earldom of Strathearn, the MacLarens lost the ownership of their lands and became tenants. They remained loyal to the Crown, however, and fought for James III at Sauchieburn in 1488, for James IV at Flodden in 1513 and for Mary Queen of Scots at Pinkie in 1547. The Crown continued to regard them as an independent clan and they were included in the Acts of Parliament for the suppression of unruly clans in 1587 and 1594. The MacLarens were related by marriage to the Stewarts of Appin, who lent them their support in feuds with neighbouring clans such as the MacGregors and the MacDonells of Keppoch.

The MacLarens fought for Montrose in support of Charles I and followed Viscount Dundee at Killiecrankie in 1689. They fought for the Stewarts in the 1715 rising and supported Prince Charles in the '45. After Culloden, where the clan suffered severely, Balquhidder was ravaged by Hanoverian troops and MacLaren of Invernentie was taken prisoner. He made a remarkable escape near Moffat en route for Carlisle and remained in hiding until the Indemnity Act of 1759

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MacLaren (or MacLaurin)

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuarts; Jacobite; Jacobites; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> One traditional account of the Clan MacLaren claims they are descended from Lorn, son of Erc, who landed in Argyll in A.D. 503. Whether or not this is true, the MacLarens are recorded as owning lands in Balquhidder and Strathearn in the 12th century. The Ragman Roll of 1296 lists three names identified as belonging to the clan: Maurice of Tyrie, Conan of Balquhidder and Laurin of Ardveche in Strathearn. <br /> <br /> In the 14th century, when the Crown annexed the Earldom of Strathearn, the MacLarens lost the ownership of their lands and became tenants. They remained loyal to the Crown, however, and fought for James III at Sauchieburn in 1488, for James IV at Flodden in 1513 and for Mary Queen of Scots at Pinkie in 1547. The Crown continued to regard them as an independent clan and they were included in the Acts of Parliament for the suppression of unruly clans in 1587 and 1594. The MacLarens were related by marriage to the Stewarts of Appin, who lent them their support in feuds with neighbouring clans such as the MacGregors and the MacDonells of Keppoch.<br /> <br /> The MacLarens fought for Montrose in support of Charles I and followed Viscount Dundee at Killiecrankie in 1689. They fought for the Stewarts in the 1715 rising and supported Prince Charles in the '45. After Culloden, where the clan suffered severely, Balquhidder was ravaged by Hanoverian troops and MacLaren of Invernentie was taken prisoner. He made a remarkable escape near Moffat en route for Carlisle and remained in hiding until the Indemnity Act of 1759