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TITLE
Ogilvie
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P018
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30836
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Jacobites
James Logan Clanbook
Ogilvie

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Ogilvies take their name from Gilbert, a descendant of the ancient Earls of Angus, who received the barony of Ogilvie from William the Lion about 1163. Patrick de Ogilvy appears on the Ragman Roll swearing fealty to Edward I in 1296 but his two sons both supported King Robert the Bruce. They obtained lands in Angus and the Ogilvies were hereditary sheriffs of Angus in the 14th and 15th centuries. The family acquired the barony of Cortachy about 1370. They fought under the Earl of Mar at Harlaw in 1411 and later in the 15th century Walter Ogilvie was Lord High Treasurer of Scotland. His son John obtained the lands of Airlie about 1459. The Ogilvie Earls of Findlater and Seafield are descended from John's brother Walter.

Sir James Ogilvie was created Lord Ogilvie of Airlie in 1491 and James, 8th Lord Ogilvie, was made Earl of Airlie in 1639. The Ogilvies were Royalists during the Civil Wars and suffered for their allegiance. James, 2nd Earl, was taken prisoner at Philiphaugh in 1648 and condemend to death by the Covenanters but escaped on the eve of his execution dressed in his sister's clothes. The Ogilvies were active in the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745 and Lord Ogilvie, son of the 4th Earl, had to flee to France. He was later pardoned and the Earldom was restored.

The Ogilvies also engaged in feuds with neighbouring clans, particularly the Lindsays and the Campbells. When the Campbells attempted to destroy the 'bonnie house of Airlie' at the beginning of the 17th century, the Ogilvies later took revenge by setting fire to Castle Gloom, the Campbell castle near Dollar

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Ogilvie

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Jacobites; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The Ogilvies take their name from Gilbert, a descendant of the ancient Earls of Angus, who received the barony of Ogilvie from William the Lion about 1163. Patrick de Ogilvy appears on the Ragman Roll swearing fealty to Edward I in 1296 but his two sons both supported King Robert the Bruce. They obtained lands in Angus and the Ogilvies were hereditary sheriffs of Angus in the 14th and 15th centuries. The family acquired the barony of Cortachy about 1370. They fought under the Earl of Mar at Harlaw in 1411 and later in the 15th century Walter Ogilvie was Lord High Treasurer of Scotland. His son John obtained the lands of Airlie about 1459. The Ogilvie Earls of Findlater and Seafield are descended from John's brother Walter.<br /> <br /> Sir James Ogilvie was created Lord Ogilvie of Airlie in 1491 and James, 8th Lord Ogilvie, was made Earl of Airlie in 1639. The Ogilvies were Royalists during the Civil Wars and suffered for their allegiance. James, 2nd Earl, was taken prisoner at Philiphaugh in 1648 and condemend to death by the Covenanters but escaped on the eve of his execution dressed in his sister's clothes. The Ogilvies were active in the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745 and Lord Ogilvie, son of the 4th Earl, had to flee to France. He was later pardoned and the Earldom was restored.<br /> <br /> The Ogilvies also engaged in feuds with neighbouring clans, particularly the Lindsays and the Campbells. When the Campbells attempted to destroy the 'bonnie house of Airlie' at the beginning of the 17th century, the Ogilvies later took revenge by setting fire to Castle Gloom, the Campbell castle near Dollar