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TITLE
Skene
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P020
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30838
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
James Logan Clanbook
Skene

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Gaelic name of this clan is Siol Sgeine no Clann Donchadh Mhar, which effectively says that the Skenes are the Robertsons of Mar. The traditional origins of the Skenes go back to the 11th century when the younger son of Robertson of Struan allegedly saved the life of the king by killing a wolf with his sgian (or knife) and was rewarded with the lands which came to be called Skene in Aberdeenshire. Subsequently the family took their name from their ownership of this land.

The first recorded bearer of the name is John de Skene who signed the Ragman Roll in 1296. His grandson Robert fought with Robert the Bruce, from whom he received a charter erecting the lands of Skene into a barony. The Skene chiefs were unfortunate in battle. Adam de Skene was killed at Harlaw in 1411, Alexander died at Flodden in 1513, and his grandson was killed at Pinkie in 1547. The Skenes were loyal to James VI and Charles I but for his support the chief had to flee to the continent where he served with Gustavus Adolphus. In 1827 the direct line of the Skenes died out and the estates passed to James, Earl of Fife, a nephew of the last Skene of Skene. The chiefship passed to the family of Skene of Hollyands.

Other prominent branches of the Skene clan include the Skenes of Dyce, Halyards, Cariston, Curriehill and Rubislaw. William Forbes Skene, one of the Skenes of Rubislaw, was a celebrated historian who was appointed Historiographer Royal for Scotland in 1881

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Skene

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The Gaelic name of this clan is Siol Sgeine no Clann Donchadh Mhar, which effectively says that the Skenes are the Robertsons of Mar. The traditional origins of the Skenes go back to the 11th century when the younger son of Robertson of Struan allegedly saved the life of the king by killing a wolf with his sgian (or knife) and was rewarded with the lands which came to be called Skene in Aberdeenshire. Subsequently the family took their name from their ownership of this land.<br /> <br /> The first recorded bearer of the name is John de Skene who signed the Ragman Roll in 1296. His grandson Robert fought with Robert the Bruce, from whom he received a charter erecting the lands of Skene into a barony. The Skene chiefs were unfortunate in battle. Adam de Skene was killed at Harlaw in 1411, Alexander died at Flodden in 1513, and his grandson was killed at Pinkie in 1547. The Skenes were loyal to James VI and Charles I but for his support the chief had to flee to the continent where he served with Gustavus Adolphus. In 1827 the direct line of the Skenes died out and the estates passed to James, Earl of Fife, a nephew of the last Skene of Skene. The chiefship passed to the family of Skene of Hollyands.<br /> <br /> Other prominent branches of the Skene clan include the Skenes of Dyce, Halyards, Cariston, Curriehill and Rubislaw. William Forbes Skene, one of the Skenes of Rubislaw, was a celebrated historian who was appointed Historiographer Royal for Scotland in 1881