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TITLE
MacPherson
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P023
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30841
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Clan Chattan
Invernahaven
Stuarts
James Logan Clanbook
MacPherson

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The name Macpherson derives from the Gaelic Mac-a Phearsain (son of the parson). The parson referred to was probably Muriach, a twelfth-century clergyman in Kingussie, from whose three grandsons are descended the three main clan families of Cluny, Pitmean and Invereshie. Over the years, the family of Cluny emerged as the most important of the three. The Macphersons claim unbroken descent from the original founder of Clan Chattan and over the centuries disputed with the Mackintoshes the leadership of the Clan Chattan confederation.

The clan received its Badenoch lands for its support of Robert the Bruce against the Comyns. Together with other members of Clan Chattan, they defeated the Camerons at the Battle of Invernahavon in 1386. The Macphersons are mentioned in the roll of broken clans in the Act of Parliament of 1594. In 1609 the Macpherson chief signed a bond acknowledging Mackintosh as chief of the Clan Chattan, but their loyalty was given as allies rather than as vassals.

In 1715 the Macphersons actively supported the Stewarts and in 1745 Euan Mapherson of Cluny raised 600 men for the army of Prince Charles. They did not arrive in time to take part in the Battle of Culloden but Cluny helped Prince Charles to escape capture. In the subsequent devastations, the house of Cluny was burned to the ground and for nine years the chief remained in hiding, mainly on his own estate. In 1755 he finally escaped to France, where he died. The forfeited Cluny estates were restored in 1784 and Cluny Castle was rebuilt

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MacPherson

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Clan Chattan; Invernahaven; Stuarts; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The name Macpherson derives from the Gaelic Mac-a Phearsain (son of the parson). The parson referred to was probably Muriach, a twelfth-century clergyman in Kingussie, from whose three grandsons are descended the three main clan families of Cluny, Pitmean and Invereshie. Over the years, the family of Cluny emerged as the most important of the three. The Macphersons claim unbroken descent from the original founder of Clan Chattan and over the centuries disputed with the Mackintoshes the leadership of the Clan Chattan confederation. <br /> <br /> The clan received its Badenoch lands for its support of Robert the Bruce against the Comyns. Together with other members of Clan Chattan, they defeated the Camerons at the Battle of Invernahavon in 1386. The Macphersons are mentioned in the roll of broken clans in the Act of Parliament of 1594. In 1609 the Macpherson chief signed a bond acknowledging Mackintosh as chief of the Clan Chattan, but their loyalty was given as allies rather than as vassals. <br /> <br /> In 1715 the Macphersons actively supported the Stewarts and in 1745 Euan Mapherson of Cluny raised 600 men for the army of Prince Charles. They did not arrive in time to take part in the Battle of Culloden but Cluny helped Prince Charles to escape capture. In the subsequent devastations, the house of Cluny was burned to the ground and for nine years the chief remained in hiding, mainly on his own estate. In 1755 he finally escaped to France, where he died. The forfeited Cluny estates were restored in 1784 and Cluny Castle was rebuilt