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TITLE
MacAulay
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P025
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30843
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
James Logan Clanbook
MacAulay

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

There are two distinct clans bearing the name MacAulay. One was associated with Ardincaple in Dumbartonshire; the other claims Lewis origins.

Of the Ardincaple family, Aulay, brother of the Earl of Lennox, signed the Ragman Roll in 1296. Some say these MacAulays were a branch of the Clan Alpine, from whom also descend the MacGregors. They certainly acknowledged close ties with the MacGregors in their 1591 and 1694 bonds of manrent. Aulay MacAulay of Ardincaple appears in the General Band of 1587 as a vassal of the Earl of Lennox, and the MacAulays appear in the Roll of Broken Clans in 1594.

The MacAulays' connection with the MacGregors led to their involvement in some of the MacGregor feuds, but the protection of the Earls of Lennox seems to have relieved them from some of the consequences of that involvement. When the MacGregors were outlawed, the MacAulays were careful to dissociate themselves from them. During the 17th century, several of the MacAulay chiefs sold some of their possessions in order to maintain their lifestyle and in 1767 the 12th chief had to sell the last of the MacAulay lands to the Duke of Argyll.

The MacAulays of Lewis claim descent from Olav the Black, the brother of Magnus, King of Man and the Isles. They were followers of Siol Torquil, or the Macleods of Lewis, and frequently feuded with the Morrisons. One of the chiefs of the Lewis MacAulays was known as Donald Camm (Donald One-Eye) who was renowned for his great strength. Donald Camm's son died at the Battle of Auldearn in 1645 fighting for Charles I. Some of this MacAulay clan lived on the mainland and followed the MacKenzies

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MacAulay

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> There are two distinct clans bearing the name MacAulay. One was associated with Ardincaple in Dumbartonshire; the other claims Lewis origins.<br /> <br /> Of the Ardincaple family, Aulay, brother of the Earl of Lennox, signed the Ragman Roll in 1296. Some say these MacAulays were a branch of the Clan Alpine, from whom also descend the MacGregors. They certainly acknowledged close ties with the MacGregors in their 1591 and 1694 bonds of manrent. Aulay MacAulay of Ardincaple appears in the General Band of 1587 as a vassal of the Earl of Lennox, and the MacAulays appear in the Roll of Broken Clans in 1594. <br /> <br /> The MacAulays' connection with the MacGregors led to their involvement in some of the MacGregor feuds, but the protection of the Earls of Lennox seems to have relieved them from some of the consequences of that involvement. When the MacGregors were outlawed, the MacAulays were careful to dissociate themselves from them. During the 17th century, several of the MacAulay chiefs sold some of their possessions in order to maintain their lifestyle and in 1767 the 12th chief had to sell the last of the MacAulay lands to the Duke of Argyll.<br /> <br /> The MacAulays of Lewis claim descent from Olav the Black, the brother of Magnus, King of Man and the Isles. They were followers of Siol Torquil, or the Macleods of Lewis, and frequently feuded with the Morrisons. One of the chiefs of the Lewis MacAulays was known as Donald Camm (Donald One-Eye) who was renowned for his great strength. Donald Camm's son died at the Battle of Auldearn in 1645 fighting for Charles I. Some of this MacAulay clan lived on the mainland and followed the MacKenzies