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TITLE
Munro
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P026
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30844
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
James Logan Clanbook
Munro

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Munro lands were in Easter Ross and were generally known as Ferindonald, from the Gaelic 'Fearainn Domhnuill', a reference to the traditional founder of the clan, Donald O'Ceann of the time of Macbeth. The earliest recorded mention of a Munro of Foulis is of Hugh who died in 1126. He is believed to have been a grandson of the Donald mentioned above.

At the beginning of the 13th century, George Munro of Foulis obtained charters from Alexander II, while later Robert of Foulis held a charter from Bruce and led the Munros at the Battle of Bannockburn. Robert, the 8th chief of Foulis, married a niece of Euphemia, daughter of the Earl of Ross and Queen of Robert II. Robert Mor, 15th chief, was a loyal supporter of Mary Queen of Scots.

Robert, the 18th chief, known as 'the Black Baron', joined the army of Gustavus Adolphus and raised a regiment of 700 Munros to fight in Sweden and Denmark. Robert greatly distinguished himself and the Munro men became known as 'The Invincibles'. Robert died in 1633 and was succeeded by his brother, Hector Munro, whom Charles I created a baronet of Nova Scotia in 1634.

The 4th Baronet was a staunch Presbyterian and fought against James VII in 1688. Sir Robert Munro, 6th Baronet, commanded the Black Watch at the Battle of Fontenoy in 1745. He and his brother George were killed at Falkirk in 1746 fighting against the Jacobites. During the '45 rising, Foulis Castle was partially destroyed and afterwards the chief began a programme of rebuilding. The castle fell into neglect once more but Sir Hector Munro, who inherited the estate in 1884, restored it as a family home

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Munro

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The Munro lands were in Easter Ross and were generally known as Ferindonald, from the Gaelic 'Fearainn Domhnuill', a reference to the traditional founder of the clan, Donald O'Ceann of the time of Macbeth. The earliest recorded mention of a Munro of Foulis is of Hugh who died in 1126. He is believed to have been a grandson of the Donald mentioned above. <br /> <br /> At the beginning of the 13th century, George Munro of Foulis obtained charters from Alexander II, while later Robert of Foulis held a charter from Bruce and led the Munros at the Battle of Bannockburn. Robert, the 8th chief of Foulis, married a niece of Euphemia, daughter of the Earl of Ross and Queen of Robert II. Robert Mor, 15th chief, was a loyal supporter of Mary Queen of Scots.<br /> <br /> Robert, the 18th chief, known as 'the Black Baron', joined the army of Gustavus Adolphus and raised a regiment of 700 Munros to fight in Sweden and Denmark. Robert greatly distinguished himself and the Munro men became known as 'The Invincibles'. Robert died in 1633 and was succeeded by his brother, Hector Munro, whom Charles I created a baronet of Nova Scotia in 1634.<br /> <br /> The 4th Baronet was a staunch Presbyterian and fought against James VII in 1688. Sir Robert Munro, 6th Baronet, commanded the Black Watch at the Battle of Fontenoy in 1745. He and his brother George were killed at Falkirk in 1746 fighting against the Jacobites. During the '45 rising, Foulis Castle was partially destroyed and afterwards the chief began a programme of rebuilding. The castle fell into neglect once more but Sir Hector Munro, who inherited the estate in 1884, restored it as a family home