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TITLE
MacMillan
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P028
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30846
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
James Logan Clanbook
MacMillan

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

Some suggest that the Macmillans were connected with the Clan Chattan, while others claim they descend from the Buchanans. The name Macmillan is a translation of the Gaelic MacMhaoilean (son of the tonsured one) and is thus of ecclesiastical origin. The Macmillans have been linked to an individual named Gilchrist, son of a certain Bishop Cormac. They were to be found in the Loch Arkaig district in Lochaber in the 12th century and tradition has it that they were moved by Malcolm IV to the Crown lands around Loch Tay. About two centuries later, they were driven from the Loch Tay district and dispersed to different parts of Scotland.

By the middle of the 14th century, many Macmillans were established in Knapdale, while others travelled further south and an offshoot settled in Galloway. Macmillan of Knap was considered to be the chief of the clan. The Macmillans appear to have received Knap first of all from the Lord of the Isles and they fought with John, Lord of the Isles, at Harlaw in 1411. They increased their possessions through a marriage with a MacNeill heiress and became quite powerful in the district. A Macmillan chief is reputed to have built a tower at Castle Sween and the Macmillan Cross stands as a memorial to a Macmillan chief in the Kilmorie Kirkyard.

With the fall of the Lordship of the Isles, the Macmillans lost their lands in Knap. An offshoot of the clan settled in Lochaber and followed the Cameron chiefs. Many of that family emigrated to Canada in the 19th century as a result of the Highland Clearances. The Galloway Macmillans are famed for the support they gave to the Covenanters during the 17th century. When the family of the Knap chiefs died out, the chiefship passed to the Macmillans of Dunmore and from them to the Lagalgarve branch of the clan

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MacMillan

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> Some suggest that the Macmillans were connected with the Clan Chattan, while others claim they descend from the Buchanans. The name Macmillan is a translation of the Gaelic MacMhaoilean (son of the tonsured one) and is thus of ecclesiastical origin. The Macmillans have been linked to an individual named Gilchrist, son of a certain Bishop Cormac. They were to be found in the Loch Arkaig district in Lochaber in the 12th century and tradition has it that they were moved by Malcolm IV to the Crown lands around Loch Tay. About two centuries later, they were driven from the Loch Tay district and dispersed to different parts of Scotland.<br /> <br /> By the middle of the 14th century, many Macmillans were established in Knapdale, while others travelled further south and an offshoot settled in Galloway. Macmillan of Knap was considered to be the chief of the clan. The Macmillans appear to have received Knap first of all from the Lord of the Isles and they fought with John, Lord of the Isles, at Harlaw in 1411. They increased their possessions through a marriage with a MacNeill heiress and became quite powerful in the district. A Macmillan chief is reputed to have built a tower at Castle Sween and the Macmillan Cross stands as a memorial to a Macmillan chief in the Kilmorie Kirkyard. <br /> <br /> With the fall of the Lordship of the Isles, the Macmillans lost their lands in Knap. An offshoot of the clan settled in Lochaber and followed the Cameron chiefs. Many of that family emigrated to Canada in the 19th century as a result of the Highland Clearances. The Galloway Macmillans are famed for the support they gave to the Covenanters during the 17th century. When the family of the Knap chiefs died out, the chiefship passed to the Macmillans of Dunmore and from them to the Lagalgarve branch of the clan