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TITLE
MacIntyre
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P030
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30848
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuarts
James Logan Clanbook
MacIntyre

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

A traditional account dates the origin of the name Macintyre to the early 12th century when Somerled was establishing himself in the Western Isles. It is commonly accepted that the name comes from the Gaelic Mac-an-t-saoir (son of the carpenter) and may have originated in more than one place. Macintyres established themselves on the fertile lands of Glen Noe by Loch Etive and by the end of the 13th century they were foresters to the Lords of Lorn.

The first chief on record is Duncan who married a daughter of Campbell of Barcaldine and died in 1695. James, who is recorded as the 3rd chief, was born about 1727. He studied law and had a reputation as a scholar and a poet. On his father's death he returned to Glen Noe. His wife and Campbell neighbours persuaded him not to support the Jacobite rising of 1745, but it is said that some Macintyres fought for Prince Charles under the banner of the Stewarts of Appin.
In the 18th century the rent on the Glen Noe lands was progressively raised to the point where Donald, the 4th recorded chief, was unable to pay and emigrated to America. His brother Duncan struggled on until 1806 but then he too had to leave. The Macintyres spread to many parts of Scotland and were notable for their versatility. Some were foresters; some were weavers. Some became bards and some hereditary pipers. One of the most famous of Gaelic poets was Duncan Ban Macintyre, born in Glenorchy in 1724. He was imprisoned for a poem he wrote against the Act of Proscription of the Highland Dress and died in Edinburgh in 1812

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MacIntyre

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuarts; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> A traditional account dates the origin of the name Macintyre to the early 12th century when Somerled was establishing himself in the Western Isles. It is commonly accepted that the name comes from the Gaelic Mac-an-t-saoir (son of the carpenter) and may have originated in more than one place. Macintyres established themselves on the fertile lands of Glen Noe by Loch Etive and by the end of the 13th century they were foresters to the Lords of Lorn. <br /> <br /> The first chief on record is Duncan who married a daughter of Campbell of Barcaldine and died in 1695. James, who is recorded as the 3rd chief, was born about 1727. He studied law and had a reputation as a scholar and a poet. On his father's death he returned to Glen Noe. His wife and Campbell neighbours persuaded him not to support the Jacobite rising of 1745, but it is said that some Macintyres fought for Prince Charles under the banner of the Stewarts of Appin.<br /> In the 18th century the rent on the Glen Noe lands was progressively raised to the point where Donald, the 4th recorded chief, was unable to pay and emigrated to America. His brother Duncan struggled on until 1806 but then he too had to leave. The Macintyres spread to many parts of Scotland and were notable for their versatility. Some were foresters; some were weavers. Some became bards and some hereditary pipers. One of the most famous of Gaelic poets was Duncan Ban Macintyre, born in Glenorchy in 1724. He was imprisoned for a poem he wrote against the Act of Proscription of the Highland Dress and died in Edinburgh in 1812