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TITLE
Stewart
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLII_P033
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30851
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuart
Stuarts
James Logan Clanbook
Stewart

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Stewarts are descended from an Anglo-Norman family, one of whom was created hereditary High Steward of Scotland by David I around 1140 and received estates in Renfrewshire. His descendants obtained lands in Kintyre, Arran and Bute. James, 5th High Steward, supported William Wallace and Robert the Bruce in the struggle for Scottish independence. Walter, 6th High Steward, married Marjory, daughter of Robert the Bruce, and from them are descended the Royal House of Stewart. The Stewart line continues to the present British royal family.

The first and principal seat of the Stewarts was in Renfrewshire, but branches of them became established in the Western Highlands and Perthshire, among them the Stewarts of Lorn, the Stewarts of Atholl, and the Stewarts of Balquhidder. The Stewarts of Atholl are directly descended from one of the most notorious Stewarts of the 14th century, Alexander Stewart, Earl of Buchan, known as 'The Wolf of Badenoch'. Later, his descendants became known as Athollmen and gave their allegiance to the Murray Earls of Atholl.

From the Stewarts of Lorn sprang the Stewarts of Appin, who became regarded as the main Highland branch of the clan. They fought at the Battle of Pinkie in 1547 under Donald Stewart of Invernahyle, known as Donald nan Ord. They supported Montrose at Inverlochy and also fought at the battles of Auldearn and Kilsyth. The chief of Appin was outlawed and his estates forfeited, but they were returned to him at the Restoration. The clan fought for Dundee in 1688 and for the Stewart kings throughout the Jacobite period. Many Stewart men were lost at the Battle of Culloden, after which a Campbell was placed as government factor on the forfeited Stewart estates. His murder in 1752 was immortalised by Robert Louis Stevenson in his novel 'Kidnapped'.

The clan name is sometimes spelt 'Stuart', a variation possibly introduced by Mary Queen of Scots

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Stewart

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuart; Stuarts; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The Stewarts are descended from an Anglo-Norman family, one of whom was created hereditary High Steward of Scotland by David I around 1140 and received estates in Renfrewshire. His descendants obtained lands in Kintyre, Arran and Bute. James, 5th High Steward, supported William Wallace and Robert the Bruce in the struggle for Scottish independence. Walter, 6th High Steward, married Marjory, daughter of Robert the Bruce, and from them are descended the Royal House of Stewart. The Stewart line continues to the present British royal family.<br /> <br /> The first and principal seat of the Stewarts was in Renfrewshire, but branches of them became established in the Western Highlands and Perthshire, among them the Stewarts of Lorn, the Stewarts of Atholl, and the Stewarts of Balquhidder. The Stewarts of Atholl are directly descended from one of the most notorious Stewarts of the 14th century, Alexander Stewart, Earl of Buchan, known as 'The Wolf of Badenoch'. Later, his descendants became known as Athollmen and gave their allegiance to the Murray Earls of Atholl.<br /> <br /> From the Stewarts of Lorn sprang the Stewarts of Appin, who became regarded as the main Highland branch of the clan. They fought at the Battle of Pinkie in 1547 under Donald Stewart of Invernahyle, known as Donald nan Ord. They supported Montrose at Inverlochy and also fought at the battles of Auldearn and Kilsyth. The chief of Appin was outlawed and his estates forfeited, but they were returned to him at the Restoration. The clan fought for Dundee in 1688 and for the Stewart kings throughout the Jacobite period. Many Stewart men were lost at the Battle of Culloden, after which a Campbell was placed as government factor on the forfeited Stewart estates. His murder in 1752 was immortalised by Robert Louis Stevenson in his novel 'Kidnapped'.<br /> <br /> The clan name is sometimes spelt 'Stuart', a variation possibly introduced by Mary Queen of Scots