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TITLE
MacDonnel of Glengarry
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P003
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30854
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Clan Donald
Stuart
James Logan Clanbook
MacDonnel of Glengarry

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

This branch of the Clan Donald is descended from Donald, second son of Ranald, progenitor of Clan Ranald. The original territory of the clan was North Morar. Alexander, 4th Chief, added the lands of Glengarry and Glenquoich. In 1519 Alexander, 6th Chief, inherited half of the estate of his father-in-law, Sir Donald MacDonald of Lochalsh, which included lands in Lochalsh, Lochcarron and Lochbroom. The Castle of Strome became the principal seat of the clan until its capture and destruction by the MacKenzies of Kintail in 1602. The loss of other lands to the MacKenzies was compensated for by the acquisition of Knoydart in 1611. After the Restoration Charles II created Angus, 9th Chief, Lord MacDonell and Aros, for his services to the Stewart cause although he died without a male heir and the peerage became extinct. It is from this time that MacDonell was adopted as the spelling of the clan name.

The clan gave further support to the Stewart dynasty and fought with distinction under Alasdair Dubh, 11th Chief, at Killiecrankie (1689) and Sherriffmuir (1715). In 1745 the clan was raised by Donald MacDonell of Lochgarry, the Chief's cousin. Invergarry Castle was burnt by Cumberland's soldiers in 1746 after Prince Charles Edward Stewart had taken refuge there after Culloden.

Alasdair Ranaldson MacDonell, 15th Chief, raised the Glengarry Fencibles in 1794 and was reputedly the model for Fergus MacIvor, the hero of Walter Scott's 'Waverley'. However, the somewhat extravagant lifestyle of the 15th Chief, and the debts he accrued, led to his estates being run by trustees before eventually being sold to the Marquess of Huntly.

The 16th Chief, Aneas Ranaldson (1828-51) emigrated to Australia in 1840 returning later to Knoydart where he died in 1851. Knoydart was cleared in 1853 after being sold to James Baird of Cambusdon and many crofters emigrated to America. The widow of the 15th Chief played a major part in these clearances. The 17th Chief, Alexander Ranaldson (1851-62), returned but then emigrated to New Zealand where he died, aged 28. The 18th Chief, Charles Ranaldson (1852-68) died on his way home from New Zealand which rendered the male line from the 11th Chief extinct. He was succeeded by his remote cousin, Ranald of Scotus

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MacDonnel of Glengarry

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Clan Donald; Stuart; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> This branch of the Clan Donald is descended from Donald, second son of Ranald, progenitor of Clan Ranald. The original territory of the clan was North Morar. Alexander, 4th Chief, added the lands of Glengarry and Glenquoich. In 1519 Alexander, 6th Chief, inherited half of the estate of his father-in-law, Sir Donald MacDonald of Lochalsh, which included lands in Lochalsh, Lochcarron and Lochbroom. The Castle of Strome became the principal seat of the clan until its capture and destruction by the MacKenzies of Kintail in 1602. The loss of other lands to the MacKenzies was compensated for by the acquisition of Knoydart in 1611. After the Restoration Charles II created Angus, 9th Chief, Lord MacDonell and Aros, for his services to the Stewart cause although he died without a male heir and the peerage became extinct. It is from this time that MacDonell was adopted as the spelling of the clan name. <br /> <br /> The clan gave further support to the Stewart dynasty and fought with distinction under Alasdair Dubh, 11th Chief, at Killiecrankie (1689) and Sherriffmuir (1715). In 1745 the clan was raised by Donald MacDonell of Lochgarry, the Chief's cousin. Invergarry Castle was burnt by Cumberland's soldiers in 1746 after Prince Charles Edward Stewart had taken refuge there after Culloden. <br /> <br /> Alasdair Ranaldson MacDonell, 15th Chief, raised the Glengarry Fencibles in 1794 and was reputedly the model for Fergus MacIvor, the hero of Walter Scott's 'Waverley'. However, the somewhat extravagant lifestyle of the 15th Chief, and the debts he accrued, led to his estates being run by trustees before eventually being sold to the Marquess of Huntly. <br /> <br /> The 16th Chief, Aneas Ranaldson (1828-51) emigrated to Australia in 1840 returning later to Knoydart where he died in 1851. Knoydart was cleared in 1853 after being sold to James Baird of Cambusdon and many crofters emigrated to America. The widow of the 15th Chief played a major part in these clearances. The 17th Chief, Alexander Ranaldson (1851-62), returned but then emigrated to New Zealand where he died, aged 28. The 18th Chief, Charles Ranaldson (1852-68) died on his way home from New Zealand which rendered the male line from the 11th Chief extinct. He was succeeded by his remote cousin, Ranald of Scotus