Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Chisholm
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P006
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30857
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuart
Jacobite
Jacobites
James Logan Clanbook
Chisholm

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Chisholms were evident in the Borders in the 13th century. The name derives from the Norman French 'Chese' (to choose) and the Saxon 'holm' (meadow). Their lands were in Roxburghshire.

Robert de Chisholme was appointed constable of Urquhart Castle in 1359. He had been knighted by David II and was taken prisoner at the battle of Nevilles Cross in 1346. He was later ransomed and lived to become sheriff of Inverness and justiciar of the North. His son Alexander married Margaret, heiress to the lands of Erchless. Upon their inheritance, Erchless Castle became the seat of the clan. The family remained staunchly Catholic during the early years of the Reformation, and the Chisholms of Cromlix in Perthshire provided three successive Bishops of Dunblane.

During the 17th century the clan chiefs became Protestant but remained tolerant of the Catholic faith. Roderick MacIain Chisholm was active in the 1715 rising and Chisholm of Crocfin led 200 men of the clan at the Battle of Sheriffmuir. The family estates were forfeited to the crown and sold, but a pardon was granted in 1727 and most of the lands were purchased back from Mackenzie of Allangrange. In 1745, Roderick, a younger son of the chief, was appointed colonel of a battalion to fight with Prince Charles Edward Stewart.

In common with many clan chiefs in the mid 18th century Ruairidh, 22nd chief, tried to raise money by increasing his tenants' rents. This led to the mass emigration to the New Worlds overseas. William, 24th Chief, gave over most of the family lands to sheep grazing and the emigrations continued

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Chisholm

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuart; Jacobite; Jacobites; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan. <br /> <br /> The Chisholms were evident in the Borders in the 13th century. The name derives from the Norman French 'Chese' (to choose) and the Saxon 'holm' (meadow). Their lands were in Roxburghshire.<br /> <br /> Robert de Chisholme was appointed constable of Urquhart Castle in 1359. He had been knighted by David II and was taken prisoner at the battle of Nevilles Cross in 1346. He was later ransomed and lived to become sheriff of Inverness and justiciar of the North. His son Alexander married Margaret, heiress to the lands of Erchless. Upon their inheritance, Erchless Castle became the seat of the clan. The family remained staunchly Catholic during the early years of the Reformation, and the Chisholms of Cromlix in Perthshire provided three successive Bishops of Dunblane.<br /> <br /> During the 17th century the clan chiefs became Protestant but remained tolerant of the Catholic faith. Roderick MacIain Chisholm was active in the 1715 rising and Chisholm of Crocfin led 200 men of the clan at the Battle of Sheriffmuir. The family estates were forfeited to the crown and sold, but a pardon was granted in 1727 and most of the lands were purchased back from Mackenzie of Allangrange. In 1745, Roderick, a younger son of the chief, was appointed colonel of a battalion to fight with Prince Charles Edward Stewart.<br /> <br /> In common with many clan chiefs in the mid 18th century Ruairidh, 22nd chief, tried to raise money by increasing his tenants' rents. This led to the mass emigration to the New Worlds overseas. William, 24th Chief, gave over most of the family lands to sheep grazing and the emigrations continued