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TITLE
MacNachtan/MacNachten
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P007
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30858
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuart
James Logan Clanbook
MacNachtan/MacNachten

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Macnaughtens claim descent from the great Pictish rulers of Moray. The name Nechtan (meaning 'pure' or 'clear') was popular in at least one branch of the Pictish royal line. Gilchrist, son of Malcolm MacNachten, was granted a charter by Alexander III in 1267 granting him the keepership of a castle warding the narrow Pass of Brander, which links the head of Loch Awe with Loch Etive. Gilchrist also held Dunderave on Loch Fyne and the castle of Dubh Loch in Glenshira. As allies of the MacDougalls of Lorne, the MacNachtens, under their chief Donald, opposed Robert the Bruce and fought him at the battle of Dalree in 1306. When Bruce became king the MacNachtens lost much of their land to the Campbells. However, their support of David II led to their being granted lands in the Isle of Lewis. The ruins of their castle can still be seen there.

The MacNachtens were also loyal supporters of the Stewart kings. Their chief, Alastair, fell with James IV at Flodden in 1513. Alexander MacNachten was a firm adherent of Charles I. In 1627 he raised a force of bowmen to go to the siege of La Rochelle to assist the French Huguenot rebels in their fight against Cardinal Richelieu. He was knighted by Charles II. John MacNachten led his clan into the Battle of Killiecrankie in support of James VII and, as a consequence, lost his estates under an Act of Forfeiture in 1691.

The 17th and last MacNachten chief, John of Dunderave, was forced to make a formal disposition of his lands to Campbell of Ardkinglas in 1710 and died leaving no legitimate heir

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MacNachtan/MacNachten

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuart; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan. <br /> <br /> The Macnaughtens claim descent from the great Pictish rulers of Moray. The name Nechtan (meaning 'pure' or 'clear') was popular in at least one branch of the Pictish royal line. Gilchrist, son of Malcolm MacNachten, was granted a charter by Alexander III in 1267 granting him the keepership of a castle warding the narrow Pass of Brander, which links the head of Loch Awe with Loch Etive. Gilchrist also held Dunderave on Loch Fyne and the castle of Dubh Loch in Glenshira. As allies of the MacDougalls of Lorne, the MacNachtens, under their chief Donald, opposed Robert the Bruce and fought him at the battle of Dalree in 1306. When Bruce became king the MacNachtens lost much of their land to the Campbells. However, their support of David II led to their being granted lands in the Isle of Lewis. The ruins of their castle can still be seen there.<br /> <br /> The MacNachtens were also loyal supporters of the Stewart kings. Their chief, Alastair, fell with James IV at Flodden in 1513. Alexander MacNachten was a firm adherent of Charles I. In 1627 he raised a force of bowmen to go to the siege of La Rochelle to assist the French Huguenot rebels in their fight against Cardinal Richelieu. He was knighted by Charles II. John MacNachten led his clan into the Battle of Killiecrankie in support of James VII and, as a consequence, lost his estates under an Act of Forfeiture in 1691.<br /> <br /> The 17th and last MacNachten chief, John of Dunderave, was forced to make a formal disposition of his lands to Campbell of Ardkinglas in 1710 and died leaving no legitimate heir