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TITLE
MacKinnon
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P008
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30859
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stewart
Stuart
Stuarts
Jacobites
James Logan Clanbook
MacKinnon

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The name and origin of the clan MacKinnon are traditionally attributed to Fingon, grandson of Gregor, son of Alpin, 34th King of Dalriada, who brought his followers to the Isle of Mull. He held land on Skye and Arran.

Findanus, the 4th chief, held lands in Mull and, around 900, acquired Dun Haakon, a broch commanding the narrow sound between Skye and the mainland. The Mackinnons ran a heavy chain across the sound and levied a toll on all passing ships. King Haakon IV assembled his fleet of longships beneath the castle of his namesake before the Battle of Largs in 1263 which effectively ended the Norse domination of the islands. The Mackinnons on Arran gave shelter to Robert the Bruce during his time as a fugitive, helping him make his escape to Carrick. After the king's victory at Bannockburn they received grants of land on Skye and made Dunringall Castle the clan seat.

On the death in 1380 of John, Lord of the Isles, the chief of the MacKinnons led an insurrection to claim the succession for his son Iain Mor. He was defeated and put to death though his son was eventually pardoned and went on to found Clan Donald South. Much of the clan's possessions on Mull were lost as a result of feuding with their MacLean neighbours. In 1628 the MacKinnon estates were created a Barony by Charles I.

The Mackinnons were loyal to the Stewarts, and fought under Montrose at the battles of Auldearn and Inverlochy. In 1651 a regiment of MacKinnons joined the forces of Charles II at the Battle of Worcester. The chief's brother, Donald, was taken prisoner and transported to the Caribbean. MacKinnons were also prominent in the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745 and had their estate forfeited in 1765, since then the MacKinnons have had no landed possessions.

The last of the chiefly line died in poverty, and without issue, in 1808. The chiefship then passed to William Alexander MacKinnon, the great-great-grandson of the Donald MacKinnon captured at Worcester

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MacKinnon

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stewart; Stuart; Stuarts; Jacobites; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan. <br /> <br /> The name and origin of the clan MacKinnon are traditionally attributed to Fingon, grandson of Gregor, son of Alpin, 34th King of Dalriada, who brought his followers to the Isle of Mull. He held land on Skye and Arran.<br /> <br /> Findanus, the 4th chief, held lands in Mull and, around 900, acquired Dun Haakon, a broch commanding the narrow sound between Skye and the mainland. The Mackinnons ran a heavy chain across the sound and levied a toll on all passing ships. King Haakon IV assembled his fleet of longships beneath the castle of his namesake before the Battle of Largs in 1263 which effectively ended the Norse domination of the islands. The Mackinnons on Arran gave shelter to Robert the Bruce during his time as a fugitive, helping him make his escape to Carrick. After the king's victory at Bannockburn they received grants of land on Skye and made Dunringall Castle the clan seat.<br /> <br /> On the death in 1380 of John, Lord of the Isles, the chief of the MacKinnons led an insurrection to claim the succession for his son Iain Mor. He was defeated and put to death though his son was eventually pardoned and went on to found Clan Donald South. Much of the clan's possessions on Mull were lost as a result of feuding with their MacLean neighbours. In 1628 the MacKinnon estates were created a Barony by Charles I.<br /> <br /> The Mackinnons were loyal to the Stewarts, and fought under Montrose at the battles of Auldearn and Inverlochy. In 1651 a regiment of MacKinnons joined the forces of Charles II at the Battle of Worcester. The chief's brother, Donald, was taken prisoner and transported to the Caribbean. MacKinnons were also prominent in the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745 and had their estate forfeited in 1765, since then the MacKinnons have had no landed possessions.<br /> <br /> The last of the chiefly line died in poverty, and without issue, in 1808. The chiefship then passed to William Alexander MacKinnon, the great-great-grandson of the Donald MacKinnon captured at Worcester