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TITLE
Farquharson
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P009
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30860
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuart
Stuarts
manrent
Jacobite
Jacobites
James Logan Clanbook
Farquharson

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Farquharsons trace their origins back to Farquhar, fourth son of Alexander Kier (Shaw) of Rothiemurchus, who possessed the Braes of Mar near the source of the River Dee in Aberdeenshire. His descendants were called Farquharsons, and his son, Donald, married Isobel Stewart, heiress of Invercauld. Donald's son, Findla Mhor, was the real progenitor of the clan. The Gaelic patronymic is MacFionlaigh Mor. Findla Mhor was royal standard bearer at the Battle of Pinkie, where he was killed in 1547. From his lifetime on, the clan grew in stature, important branches being founded through the nine sons of his two marriages. Before the time of Findla Mhor the Farquharsons were called clan Erachar or Earachar (the gaelic for Farquhar) and most of the branches of the family, particularly those who settled in Atholl, were called MacEarachar. Those descendants of Findla Mhor who settled in the Lowlands had their name changed from MacKinlay to Finlayson.

Being numerically weaker than some of their predatory neighbours, the Farquharsons joined the confederation known as Clan Chattan by a bond of man-rent to the chief of the Mackintosh in 1595. Each time the Fiery Cross was sent through the glens of the Upper Dee, the Farquharsons would gather at the Cairn-a-Quheen (Cairn of Remembrance) at the foot of Glen Feardar. This cairn is said to have originated in a custom of the clan whereby each man, on being summoned, would bring a stone to the cairn and lay it a short distance away. On returning from the raid, each survivor would lift a stone and carry it away. The remaining stones were counted, to ascertain the number of dead, and then added to the cairn. Each stone therefore represents a Farquharson killed serving the clan.

The clan's fierce reputation led to their being known as the fighting Farquharsons, and they were staunch supporters of the Stewarts. Donald Farquharson of Monaltrie fought with Montrose in 1644, and followed Charles II to Worcester in 1651. They were part of the Clan Chattan regiment in 1715 and, during the '45, formed two battalions, one of Farquharsons of Balmoral, and the other led by Francis Farquharson of Monaltrie

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Farquharson

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuart; Stuarts; manrent; Jacobite; Jacobites; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan. <br /> <br /> The Farquharsons trace their origins back to Farquhar, fourth son of Alexander Kier (Shaw) of Rothiemurchus, who possessed the Braes of Mar near the source of the River Dee in Aberdeenshire. His descendants were called Farquharsons, and his son, Donald, married Isobel Stewart, heiress of Invercauld. Donald's son, Findla Mhor, was the real progenitor of the clan. The Gaelic patronymic is MacFionlaigh Mor. Findla Mhor was royal standard bearer at the Battle of Pinkie, where he was killed in 1547. From his lifetime on, the clan grew in stature, important branches being founded through the nine sons of his two marriages. Before the time of Findla Mhor the Farquharsons were called clan Erachar or Earachar (the gaelic for Farquhar) and most of the branches of the family, particularly those who settled in Atholl, were called MacEarachar. Those descendants of Findla Mhor who settled in the Lowlands had their name changed from MacKinlay to Finlayson.<br /> <br /> Being numerically weaker than some of their predatory neighbours, the Farquharsons joined the confederation known as Clan Chattan by a bond of man-rent to the chief of the Mackintosh in 1595. Each time the Fiery Cross was sent through the glens of the Upper Dee, the Farquharsons would gather at the Cairn-a-Quheen (Cairn of Remembrance) at the foot of Glen Feardar. This cairn is said to have originated in a custom of the clan whereby each man, on being summoned, would bring a stone to the cairn and lay it a short distance away. On returning from the raid, each survivor would lift a stone and carry it away. The remaining stones were counted, to ascertain the number of dead, and then added to the cairn. Each stone therefore represents a Farquharson killed serving the clan.<br /> <br /> The clan's fierce reputation led to their being known as the fighting Farquharsons, and they were staunch supporters of the Stewarts. Donald Farquharson of Monaltrie fought with Montrose in 1644, and followed Charles II to Worcester in 1651. They were part of the Clan Chattan regiment in 1715 and, during the '45, formed two battalions, one of Farquharsons of Balmoral, and the other led by Francis Farquharson of Monaltrie