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TITLE
Menzies
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P010
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30861
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stewart
Stuart
Stuarts
Jacobite
Jacobites
James Logan Clanbook
Menzies

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

Mesnieres in Normandy was the homeland of the Norman family who, after coming to England, changed their name to Manners. The first record of the name is of Anketillus de Maynoers during the reign of William the Lion (1143-1214). In 1249 Sir Robert de Meyneris became chamberlain in the court of Alexander II. He received grants of lands in Glen Lyon and Athol. His son Alexander acquired the lands of Weem and Aberfeldy in Atholl, and Glendochart in Breadalbane. His son, Sir Robert Menzies, was a companion of Robert the Bruce and was rewarded with lands in Glendochart, Finlarig, Glenorchy and Durisdeer. James IV erected the Menzies lands into a free barony in 1510.

Major Duncan Menzies of Fornock led his men at the battle of Killiecrankie in 1689. In 1715, when the Stewarts called on their loyal subjects to rise, Menzies of Culdares rallied to the standard of the Old Pretender. He was captured at Dunblane and spent many years in exile in America.

Castle Menzies, the principal seat of the chief, is situated to the east of Loch Tay, in the parish of and near to the church in Weem, Perthshire. Weem Castle, its predecessor, was burnt by Neil Stewart of Fortingal in 1502, after a dispute over the lands of Rannoch. Castle Menzies was commandeered by the military during World War II and fell into disuse thereafter. It was purchased by the clan society in 1958 and has since been restored

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Menzies

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stewart; Stuart; Stuarts; Jacobite; Jacobites; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan. <br /> <br /> Mesnieres in Normandy was the homeland of the Norman family who, after coming to England, changed their name to Manners. The first record of the name is of Anketillus de Maynoers during the reign of William the Lion (1143-1214). In 1249 Sir Robert de Meyneris became chamberlain in the court of Alexander II. He received grants of lands in Glen Lyon and Athol. His son Alexander acquired the lands of Weem and Aberfeldy in Atholl, and Glendochart in Breadalbane. His son, Sir Robert Menzies, was a companion of Robert the Bruce and was rewarded with lands in Glendochart, Finlarig, Glenorchy and Durisdeer. James IV erected the Menzies lands into a free barony in 1510.<br /> <br /> Major Duncan Menzies of Fornock led his men at the battle of Killiecrankie in 1689. In 1715, when the Stewarts called on their loyal subjects to rise, Menzies of Culdares rallied to the standard of the Old Pretender. He was captured at Dunblane and spent many years in exile in America.<br /> <br /> Castle Menzies, the principal seat of the chief, is situated to the east of Loch Tay, in the parish of and near to the church in Weem, Perthshire. Weem Castle, its predecessor, was burnt by Neil Stewart of Fortingal in 1502, after a dispute over the lands of Rannoch. Castle Menzies was commandeered by the military during World War II and fell into disuse thereafter. It was purchased by the clan society in 1958 and has since been restored