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TITLE
Gunn
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P012
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30863
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
James Logan Clanbook
Gunn

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Gunns are of Norse-Viking descent. The territory of the Clan Gunn lay in Caithness and Sutherland where they claimed descent from Gunni, believed to be the second son of Olav the Black, Norse King of Man and the Isles who died about 1237. However, there is no evidence to support this and there are two other accounts of the clan's origins in which they descend from two different Vikings, also named Gunni. The clan's early emblem was a galley or longship, symbolising their ancestral Norse mother-goddess, Freya.

Some have suggested that the name Gunn comes from the Norse "gunnr", meaning war. As the clan's history is littered with wars, conflicts and feuds with their numerically superior neighbours, this description is quite apt. A long-running feud was conducted against their bitter enemies the Keiths, stemming from the abduction of a daughter of the Braemor family, and many bloody battles were fought between the two. Notably, in 1464, a meeting was called at St. Tears (Tayres) to resolve their differences and attempt reconciliation. The meeting was to be attended by 12 horsemen from either clan; however, legend has it that the Keiths arrived with two men on each horse and massacred the Gunns. Amongst the dead was their chief, George Gunn, who held the office of Coroner of Caithness ("Am Breisteach Mor"). It is from his sons that most Gunn sept families claim descent.

There were four main branches of the Clan Gunn. The Coroner's sons James, William and Henry settled around Strathullie in Sutherland, largely as the MacHamish Gunns; Robert remained in the Braemore and Latheron area of Caithness and founded the Robson Gunns or Gunns of Braemore; the sons of John became the Bregaul Gunns of Dale; the fourth branch, the Henderson Gunns of the Caithness lowlands, was formed by Henry after a dispute with James led him to leave Sutherland. This last branch had lands in Halkirk and Westerdale.

The clan suffered perhaps its greatest losses during the Clearances in Sutherland when many were sent to Canada and New Zealand

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Gunn

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan. <br /> <br /> The Gunns are of Norse-Viking descent. The territory of the Clan Gunn lay in Caithness and Sutherland where they claimed descent from Gunni, believed to be the second son of Olav the Black, Norse King of Man and the Isles who died about 1237. However, there is no evidence to support this and there are two other accounts of the clan's origins in which they descend from two different Vikings, also named Gunni. The clan's early emblem was a galley or longship, symbolising their ancestral Norse mother-goddess, Freya.<br /> <br /> Some have suggested that the name Gunn comes from the Norse "gunnr", meaning war. As the clan's history is littered with wars, conflicts and feuds with their numerically superior neighbours, this description is quite apt. A long-running feud was conducted against their bitter enemies the Keiths, stemming from the abduction of a daughter of the Braemor family, and many bloody battles were fought between the two. Notably, in 1464, a meeting was called at St. Tears (Tayres) to resolve their differences and attempt reconciliation. The meeting was to be attended by 12 horsemen from either clan; however, legend has it that the Keiths arrived with two men on each horse and massacred the Gunns. Amongst the dead was their chief, George Gunn, who held the office of Coroner of Caithness ("Am Breisteach Mor"). It is from his sons that most Gunn sept families claim descent.<br /> <br /> There were four main branches of the Clan Gunn. The Coroner's sons James, William and Henry settled around Strathullie in Sutherland, largely as the MacHamish Gunns; Robert remained in the Braemore and Latheron area of Caithness and founded the Robson Gunns or Gunns of Braemore; the sons of John became the Bregaul Gunns of Dale; the fourth branch, the Henderson Gunns of the Caithness lowlands, was formed by Henry after a dispute with James led him to leave Sutherland. This last branch had lands in Halkirk and Westerdale.<br /> <br /> The clan suffered perhaps its greatest losses during the Clearances in Sutherland when many were sent to Canada and New Zealand