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TITLE
Gordon
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P017
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30868
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
regiment
regiments
James Logan Clanbook
Gordon

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

Gordon is a Berwickshire place-name and the family associated with it are believed to be of Anglo-Norman descent. They moved from the Borders to Aberdeenshire in the 14th century when Sir Adam Gordon of Huntly was granted lands in Strathbogie by King Robert the Bruce. The Gordons made their permanent home there, taking the name of Huntly with them, and in 1449 Sir Alexander Gordon was created Earl of Huntly. The 6th Earl was created Marquis of Huntly in 1599 and the 4th Marquis became Duke of Gordon in 1684. The dukedom lapsed when the 5th Duke of Gordon died without issue in 1836. The marquisate passed to the Earl of Aboyne and the estates to the Duke of Richmond, who in 1876 was also created Duke of Gordon. The Clan Gordon was at one period one of the most powerful in the north, and their chief was often styled 'Cock o' the North'.

In the political manoeuvrings surrounding Mary Queen of Scots, the Gordons were branded as rebels and Mary herself led an army against them. The Earl of Huntly was taken prisoner and died of a stroke, while his son was captured and beheaded in the Queen's presence. By the time of the Bishops' Wars, the Gordons had become supportive of the Scottish crown and were defeated by the Earl of Montrose at Bridge of Dee in 1639. Later, when Montrose refused to fight for the second Covenant, he and the Gordons found themselves fighting for the King on the same side. The Gordons supported the Jacobites in the 1715 rebellion and provided two regiments to fight for Prince Charles at Culloden, although the 3rd Duke supported the Hanoverians. The regiment known as the Gordon Highlanders was first raised by the 4th Duke of Gordon in 1794

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Gordon

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; regiment; regiments; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> Gordon is a Berwickshire place-name and the family associated with it are believed to be of Anglo-Norman descent. They moved from the Borders to Aberdeenshire in the 14th century when Sir Adam Gordon of Huntly was granted lands in Strathbogie by King Robert the Bruce. The Gordons made their permanent home there, taking the name of Huntly with them, and in 1449 Sir Alexander Gordon was created Earl of Huntly. The 6th Earl was created Marquis of Huntly in 1599 and the 4th Marquis became Duke of Gordon in 1684. The dukedom lapsed when the 5th Duke of Gordon died without issue in 1836. The marquisate passed to the Earl of Aboyne and the estates to the Duke of Richmond, who in 1876 was also created Duke of Gordon. The Clan Gordon was at one period one of the most powerful in the north, and their chief was often styled 'Cock o' the North'. <br /> <br /> In the political manoeuvrings surrounding Mary Queen of Scots, the Gordons were branded as rebels and Mary herself led an army against them. The Earl of Huntly was taken prisoner and died of a stroke, while his son was captured and beheaded in the Queen's presence. By the time of the Bishops' Wars, the Gordons had become supportive of the Scottish crown and were defeated by the Earl of Montrose at Bridge of Dee in 1639. Later, when Montrose refused to fight for the second Covenant, he and the Gordons found themselves fighting for the King on the same side. The Gordons supported the Jacobites in the 1715 rebellion and provided two regiments to fight for Prince Charles at Culloden, although the 3rd Duke supported the Hanoverians. The regiment known as the Gordon Highlanders was first raised by the 4th Duke of Gordon in 1794