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TITLE
Drummond
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P018
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30869
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuart
Stuarts
Jacobites
James Logan Clanbook
Drummond

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The name Drummond is thought to derive from the place-name Drymen in Stirlingshire. Tradition traces the family to Hungarian origins but they may equally have been of Celtic stock. The chief of the family when they first appear in written records was Malcolm Beg of Drymen, who became Steward of the Lennox in 1225. A later Malcolm de Drymen supported Bruce at Bannockburn in 1314 and is said to have been responsible for the use of caltrops, or iron spikes, which had disastrous effects for the English cavalry, a circumstance commemorated by the inclusion of caltrops in the Drummond coat of arms. Bruce rewarded the Drummonds with lands in Perthshire which became their permanent home.

No fewer than three Scottish kings loved Drummond women. King David II married Margaret Drummond, while King Robert III married her niece Annabella Drummond, mother of James I. A century later, tradition has it that James IV fell in love with Margaret, daughter of the Sir John Drummond who was created Lord Drummond in 1488. Margaret died in mysterious circumstances and James went on to marry Margaret Tudor.

In 1605 the 4th Lord Drummond was created Earl of Perth. As a result of loyalty to the Stewart kings, the 4th Earl was made a Duke by James VII, but the Drummonds also suffered with the Stewarts in their misfortunes. Following the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745, the Drummond estates were forfeited but were eventually restored by Act of Parliament

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Drummond

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuart; Stuarts; Jacobites; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The name Drummond is thought to derive from the place-name Drymen in Stirlingshire. Tradition traces the family to Hungarian origins but they may equally have been of Celtic stock. The chief of the family when they first appear in written records was Malcolm Beg of Drymen, who became Steward of the Lennox in 1225. A later Malcolm de Drymen supported Bruce at Bannockburn in 1314 and is said to have been responsible for the use of caltrops, or iron spikes, which had disastrous effects for the English cavalry, a circumstance commemorated by the inclusion of caltrops in the Drummond coat of arms. Bruce rewarded the Drummonds with lands in Perthshire which became their permanent home. <br /> <br /> No fewer than three Scottish kings loved Drummond women. King David II married Margaret Drummond, while King Robert III married her niece Annabella Drummond, mother of James I. A century later, tradition has it that James IV fell in love with Margaret, daughter of the Sir John Drummond who was created Lord Drummond in 1488. Margaret died in mysterious circumstances and James went on to marry Margaret Tudor. <br /> <br /> In 1605 the 4th Lord Drummond was created Earl of Perth. As a result of loyalty to the Stewart kings, the 4th Earl was made a Duke by James VII, but the Drummonds also suffered with the Stewarts in their misfortunes. Following the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745, the Drummond estates were forfeited but were eventually restored by Act of Parliament