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TITLE
MacLean
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P019
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30870
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuart
Stuarts
Jacobite
Jacobites
James Logan Clanbook
MacLean

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

According to tradition, the progenitor of the Clan MacLean was one Gilleathain na Tuaidh, Gillean of the Battle-Axe, who lived in the 13th century. Among his descendants were two brothers: Lachlan Lubanach, founder of the MacLean family of Duart, and Eachan Reaganach, progenitor of the MacLaines of Lochbuie. The MacLeans supported Bruce at Bannockburn in 1314 and some time after this settled in Mull, although they appear originally to have belonged to Moray.

The MacLeans of Duart married into the family of the Lord of the Isles and grew in favour with the MacDonalds, dispossessing in the process the MacKinnon clan of many of their Mull lands. By the time of the fall of the Lordship in 1493, the MacLeans possessed lands in Mull, Coll and Tiree, and on the mainland in Morven and Ardgour. The MacLeans fought for the MacDonalds at the Battle of Harlaw, where their chief Red Hector of the Battles was killed.

Lachlan MacLean of Duart was killed at Flodden in 1513 and during the 16th and 17th centuries the MacLeans played a prominent role in the Western Isles. In 1632 Lachlan MacLean of Morven, heir to Hector MacLean of Duart, was created a baronet. In the civil wars the MacLeans fought for the royal cause, following Montrose at Inverlochy and fighting for Charles II at Inverkeithing. At this latter battle seven brothers in the clan each gave his life to protect his chief. In 1680 the MacLeans lost Duart Castle while supporting the Stewart cause. They fought for James VII at the Battle of Killiecrankie and also supported the Stewarts in 1715 and 1745. Duart Castle was recovered by Sir Fitzroy MacLean around 1910

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MacLean

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuart; Stuarts; Jacobite; Jacobites; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> According to tradition, the progenitor of the Clan MacLean was one Gilleathain na Tuaidh, Gillean of the Battle-Axe, who lived in the 13th century. Among his descendants were two brothers: Lachlan Lubanach, founder of the MacLean family of Duart, and Eachan Reaganach, progenitor of the MacLaines of Lochbuie. The MacLeans supported Bruce at Bannockburn in 1314 and some time after this settled in Mull, although they appear originally to have belonged to Moray.<br /> <br /> The MacLeans of Duart married into the family of the Lord of the Isles and grew in favour with the MacDonalds, dispossessing in the process the MacKinnon clan of many of their Mull lands. By the time of the fall of the Lordship in 1493, the MacLeans possessed lands in Mull, Coll and Tiree, and on the mainland in Morven and Ardgour. The MacLeans fought for the MacDonalds at the Battle of Harlaw, where their chief Red Hector of the Battles was killed. <br /> <br /> Lachlan MacLean of Duart was killed at Flodden in 1513 and during the 16th and 17th centuries the MacLeans played a prominent role in the Western Isles. In 1632 Lachlan MacLean of Morven, heir to Hector MacLean of Duart, was created a baronet. In the civil wars the MacLeans fought for the royal cause, following Montrose at Inverlochy and fighting for Charles II at Inverkeithing. At this latter battle seven brothers in the clan each gave his life to protect his chief. In 1680 the MacLeans lost Duart Castle while supporting the Stewart cause. They fought for James VII at the Battle of Killiecrankie and also supported the Stewarts in 1715 and 1745. Duart Castle was recovered by Sir Fitzroy MacLean around 1910