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TITLE
MacNiel (or MacNeil)
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P021
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30872
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
James Logan Clanbook
MacNiel (or MacNeil)

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

There were two main branches of the Clan MacNiel (or MacNeil or MacNeill): the MacNeills of Barra and the MacNeills of Gigha. The first clan chief to appear in a charter is Neil Og, who received lands in Kintyre from Robert the Bruce. In 1427 the Lord of the Isles granted Neil Og's great-grandson Gilleonan a new charter for Barra and the lands of Boisdale in South Uist. This charter was confirmed in 1495 by James IV after the forfeiture of the lands of the Lords of the Isles.

The MacNeills of Barra subsequently supported the MacLeans of Duart, while the MacNeills of Gigha followed the MacDonalds of Islay. In the feuds of the MacLeans and the MacDonalds, the two branches of the MacNeills were often found fighting on opposing sides.

The MacNeills of Barra were expert seamen, among whom Rory the Turbulent was a particularly colourful character. When Queen Elizabeth of England complained of his piracy, he was summoned to appear before the Privy Council in Edinburgh but he ignored the summons and eventually was captured by a trick. At his trial he explained that he had thought himself bound, as a loyal subject, to avenge the injury done by the Queen of England to the king's mother, Mary Queen of Scots. With this defence he procured his pardon but his estate was forfeited.

Barra had to be sold in 1838 but it was re-acquired a century later and Kisimul Castle was restored. Gigha passed from the MacNeills of Taynish to the MacNeills of Colonsay in 1780 but later passed out of the clan

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MacNiel (or MacNeil)

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> There were two main branches of the Clan MacNiel (or MacNeil or MacNeill): the MacNeills of Barra and the MacNeills of Gigha. The first clan chief to appear in a charter is Neil Og, who received lands in Kintyre from Robert the Bruce. In 1427 the Lord of the Isles granted Neil Og's great-grandson Gilleonan a new charter for Barra and the lands of Boisdale in South Uist. This charter was confirmed in 1495 by James IV after the forfeiture of the lands of the Lords of the Isles.<br /> <br /> The MacNeills of Barra subsequently supported the MacLeans of Duart, while the MacNeills of Gigha followed the MacDonalds of Islay. In the feuds of the MacLeans and the MacDonalds, the two branches of the MacNeills were often found fighting on opposing sides. <br /> <br /> The MacNeills of Barra were expert seamen, among whom Rory the Turbulent was a particularly colourful character. When Queen Elizabeth of England complained of his piracy, he was summoned to appear before the Privy Council in Edinburgh but he ignored the summons and eventually was captured by a trick. At his trial he explained that he had thought himself bound, as a loyal subject, to avenge the injury done by the Queen of England to the king's mother, Mary Queen of Scots. With this defence he procured his pardon but his estate was forfeited. <br /> <br /> Barra had to be sold in 1838 but it was re-acquired a century later and Kisimul Castle was restored. Gigha passed from the MacNeills of Taynish to the MacNeills of Colonsay in 1780 but later passed out of the clan