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TITLE
Grant
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P023
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30874
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
James Logan Clanbook
Grant

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

Some sources suggest that the name Grant derives from the French 'le Grand' and that the Grants are Anglo-Norman. Others claim that the Grants are descended from King Alpin, father of Kenneth MacAlpine, first king of Picts and Scots, and that they are a branch of the MacGregors.

In the 13th century the Grants are recorded as Sheriffs of Inverness and they exerted considerable influence in the north-east of Scotland. They supported both Wallace and Bruce against the English. John Grant, a chief of the clan, married the daughter of Gilbert of Glencairnie and from his sons descend the Grants of Freuchie and the Grants of Tullochgorm. As a reward for serving the cause of William of Orange, the barony of Freuchie was conferred semi-royal rights and privileges.

The Grants were consistently Royalists and fought with Montrose as well as for James VII. In the Jacobite risings the bulk of the clan supported the Hanoverian side but the Grants of Glenmoriston supported the Jacobite cause.

In the middle of the eighteenth century Sir Ludovic Grant married Margaret, daughter of James Ogilvie, Earl of Findlater and Seafield, and through that alliance his grandson, Sir Lewis Alexander Grant, succeeded to the Seafield peerage. Sir Ludovic's son, Sir James Grant, played a distinguished part on Speyside, where he founded the village of Grantown in the late 18th century.

The clan is subdivided into a number of branches which often pursued quite separate and independent policies. The chiefly branch is Freuchie but other important branches were Glenmoriston, Ballindalloch, Tullochgorm, Monymusk and Dalvey. The chiefs of Clan Grant are Lords Strathspey

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Grant

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> Some sources suggest that the name Grant derives from the French 'le Grand' and that the Grants are Anglo-Norman. Others claim that the Grants are descended from King Alpin, father of Kenneth MacAlpine, first king of Picts and Scots, and that they are a branch of the MacGregors.<br /> <br /> In the 13th century the Grants are recorded as Sheriffs of Inverness and they exerted considerable influence in the north-east of Scotland. They supported both Wallace and Bruce against the English. John Grant, a chief of the clan, married the daughter of Gilbert of Glencairnie and from his sons descend the Grants of Freuchie and the Grants of Tullochgorm. As a reward for serving the cause of William of Orange, the barony of Freuchie was conferred semi-royal rights and privileges. <br /> <br /> The Grants were consistently Royalists and fought with Montrose as well as for James VII. In the Jacobite risings the bulk of the clan supported the Hanoverian side but the Grants of Glenmoriston supported the Jacobite cause. <br /> <br /> In the middle of the eighteenth century Sir Ludovic Grant married Margaret, daughter of James Ogilvie, Earl of Findlater and Seafield, and through that alliance his grandson, Sir Lewis Alexander Grant, succeeded to the Seafield peerage. Sir Ludovic's son, Sir James Grant, played a distinguished part on Speyside, where he founded the village of Grantown in the late 18th century. <br /> <br /> The clan is subdivided into a number of branches which often pursued quite separate and independent policies. The chiefly branch is Freuchie but other important branches were Glenmoriston, Ballindalloch, Tullochgorm, Monymusk and Dalvey. The chiefs of Clan Grant are Lords Strathspey