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TITLE
MacDougall (or MacDugall)
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P026
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30877
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuarts
Jacobites
James Logan Clanbook
MacDougall (or MacDugall)

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The origin of the name Dugall is said to be 'Dubh-gall' meaning 'black stranger', a name often used of Norse invaders. The Dugall from whom the MacDougalls take their name was the eldest son of Somerled, Lord of the Isles, and his Norwegian wife. King Dougal of the Isles received lands in Lorn and his sons were appointed by King Haakon of Norway to govern the Western Isles. However, in 1263, when Haakon arrived to attack Scotland further south, the MacDougalls declined to join him. Haakon was defeated at the Battle of Largs and surrendered the Western Isles to Scotland in 1266.

The 4th MacDougall chief married a sister of John Comyn and in consequence the MacDougalls became enemies of Robert the Bruce. In one battle with the MacDougalls Bruce is said to have escaped only by discarding his cloak with his brooch, henceforth known as the Brooch of Lorn and still in the possession of the MacDougall clan. When Bruce secured the throne, he deprived the MacDougalls of their lands. Alexander MacDougall submitted to the King but his son John fled to England, where he became an Admiral in the English fleet. He was later captured in the Western Isles and imprisoned, but was released on the death of King Robert. He married a granddaughter of Robert the Bruce and the MacDougall lands were restored to him. His son died without male issue and the Lorn lands passed to the Stewarts in 1388. The MacDougalls were confirmed in their Dunolly and Oban possessions in 1457. When the clan joined in the 1715 Jacobite rising, they lost their estates once more but these were restored just prior to 1745 because of their subsequent loyalty to the Crown.

It is the custom in the Highlands for the heiress to a chiefship to be called the 'Maid' of her inheritance. The MacDougall heiresses bear the ancient title 'Maid of Lorn'

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MacDougall (or MacDugall)

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuarts; Jacobites; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The origin of the name Dugall is said to be 'Dubh-gall' meaning 'black stranger', a name often used of Norse invaders. The Dugall from whom the MacDougalls take their name was the eldest son of Somerled, Lord of the Isles, and his Norwegian wife. King Dougal of the Isles received lands in Lorn and his sons were appointed by King Haakon of Norway to govern the Western Isles. However, in 1263, when Haakon arrived to attack Scotland further south, the MacDougalls declined to join him. Haakon was defeated at the Battle of Largs and surrendered the Western Isles to Scotland in 1266. <br /> <br /> The 4th MacDougall chief married a sister of John Comyn and in consequence the MacDougalls became enemies of Robert the Bruce. In one battle with the MacDougalls Bruce is said to have escaped only by discarding his cloak with his brooch, henceforth known as the Brooch of Lorn and still in the possession of the MacDougall clan. When Bruce secured the throne, he deprived the MacDougalls of their lands. Alexander MacDougall submitted to the King but his son John fled to England, where he became an Admiral in the English fleet. He was later captured in the Western Isles and imprisoned, but was released on the death of King Robert. He married a granddaughter of Robert the Bruce and the MacDougall lands were restored to him. His son died without male issue and the Lorn lands passed to the Stewarts in 1388. The MacDougalls were confirmed in their Dunolly and Oban possessions in 1457. When the clan joined in the 1715 Jacobite rising, they lost their estates once more but these were restored just prior to 1745 because of their subsequent loyalty to the Crown. <br /> <br /> It is the custom in the Highlands for the heiress to a chiefship to be called the 'Maid' of her inheritance. The MacDougall heiresses bear the ancient title 'Maid of Lorn'