Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Tain - Voices From Their Past (9 of 13)
EXTERNAL ID
TDM_PAULLIPPOK_01
PLACENAME
Tain
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Tain
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Paul Lippok
SOURCE
Tain & District Museum
ASSET ID
3088
KEYWORDS
audios
Second World War
World War 2

Get Adobe Flash player

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Tain and District Museum. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The gentleman being interviewed in this extract is Paul Lippok.

'My name is Paul Lippok. I was born on the eighth of June, 1926, in the county of Silesia, which is Eastern Germany, and now belongs par- is part of Poland. I was brought up in a very Christian environment - the county itself was imbued with Christian values - and my parents brought us up in that sort of - according to that - our faith. It was a happy childhood. When I went to school - was in the public school - and I completed my eight years, and after that I had to do one year work on the land which was part of the - Hitler's regime - so that we would get to know how hard work on the farm was. When I joined then - I sat my apprenticeship in the Post Office and at that time, which was just about 1940, Germany had invaded France and our first encounter with British prisoners were when they arrived in our county in several working camps. I myself, in the Post Office, had the opportunity to meet them up close hand when their Red Cross parcels arrived and a couple of prisoners and a guard came along with a hand wagon to collect those parcels which we then handed them over hand to hand and, not only that but there was a smile and some sort of greeting between us. I finished my apprenticeship and I was expecting to be called up any time after my seventeen and a half years of age. Unknown to me of course, those prisoners which we knew only as British prisoners, were actually members of the local Seaforth Highlanders as I came to discover when I arrived in Tain, and that made the whole thing far more interesting because quite a number of prisoners were camped in a working camp where my granny used to live and I used to see them - one of them being Hugh MacKenzie of Tain. And also, further on, after I had settled down in Tain and joined the Tain Accordian Band I was playing next to Archie Ross who was the local amateur cycle champion and was in another working camp only about twelve miles from my home. Extremely interesting to discover that and wonderful friendship ensued from that.'

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Tain - Voices From Their Past (9 of 13)

ROSS: Tain

2000s

audios; Second World War; World War 2;

Tain & District Museum

Voices From Their Past - Tain

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Tain and District Museum. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The gentleman being interviewed in this extract is Paul Lippok.<br /> <br /> 'My name is Paul Lippok. I was born on the eighth of June, 1926, in the county of Silesia, which is Eastern Germany, and now belongs par- is part of Poland. I was brought up in a very Christian environment - the county itself was imbued with Christian values - and my parents brought us up in that sort of - according to that - our faith. It was a happy childhood. When I went to school - was in the public school - and I completed my eight years, and after that I had to do one year work on the land which was part of the - Hitler's regime - so that we would get to know how hard work on the farm was. When I joined then - I sat my apprenticeship in the Post Office and at that time, which was just about 1940, Germany had invaded France and our first encounter with British prisoners were when they arrived in our county in several working camps. I myself, in the Post Office, had the opportunity to meet them up close hand when their Red Cross parcels arrived and a couple of prisoners and a guard came along with a hand wagon to collect those parcels which we then handed them over hand to hand and, not only that but there was a smile and some sort of greeting between us. I finished my apprenticeship and I was expecting to be called up any time after my seventeen and a half years of age. Unknown to me of course, those prisoners which we knew only as British prisoners, were actually members of the local Seaforth Highlanders as I came to discover when I arrived in Tain, and that made the whole thing far more interesting because quite a number of prisoners were camped in a working camp where my granny used to live and I used to see them - one of them being Hugh MacKenzie of Tain. And also, further on, after I had settled down in Tain and joined the Tain Accordian Band I was playing next to Archie Ross who was the local amateur cycle champion and was in another working camp only about twelve miles from my home. Extremely interesting to discover that and wonderful friendship ensued from that.'