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TITLE
MacFarlane
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P029
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30880
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuarts
James Logan Clanbook
MacFarlane

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The MacFarlanes trace their descent from Gilchrist, brother of Maldowen, 3rd Earl of Lennox in the 13th century. Gilchrist's great-grandson was called Bartholomew, and from its Gaelic equivalent Parlan, the clan derives its name. Parlan's son Malcolm is described as MacParlan in an early charter confirming him in the lands of Arrochar.

Duncan MacFarlane, 6th chief of the clan, obtained a charter from the Earl of Lennox further confirming him in the lands of Arrochar and in 1395 he acquired many of the adjoining lands by marriage. When the last of the old Earls of Lennox died without male issue, the MacFarlanes claimed the earldom. However, it was finally settled on the Stewarts of Darnley. This led to a long enmity between the MacFarlanes and the Stewarts which only ended when Andrew MacFarlane married a daughter of the Earl of Lennox in the 15th century.

In the 16th century the MacFarlanes fought alongside the Earls of Lennox in many battles. Duncan MacFarlane fought with the Earl of Lennox at the Battle of Glasgow Muir in 1544 and was later killed at the Battle of Pinkie in 1547. The MacFarlanes fought against Mary Queen of Scots in 1568 at the Battle of Langside, where they boast of having captured three of the queen's standards.

In the 16th century the MacFarlanes' frequent raids and their association with the MacGregors brought them an unenviable notoriety. Because their raids usually took place on clear nights, the moon came to be known in the Loch Lomond region as 'MacFarlane's Lantern'. By an act passed in 1594, the MacFarlanes were denounced as thieves, robbers and oppressors. In the 17th century the clan name was proscribed and the MacFarlane lands were declared forfeit. Some members of the clan emigrated to Ireland and some to America. Walter, 20th chief, who died in 1767, was one of the most famous antiquarians and genealogists of his time

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MacFarlane

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuarts; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The MacFarlanes trace their descent from Gilchrist, brother of Maldowen, 3rd Earl of Lennox in the 13th century. Gilchrist's great-grandson was called Bartholomew, and from its Gaelic equivalent Parlan, the clan derives its name. Parlan's son Malcolm is described as MacParlan in an early charter confirming him in the lands of Arrochar.<br /> <br /> Duncan MacFarlane, 6th chief of the clan, obtained a charter from the Earl of Lennox further confirming him in the lands of Arrochar and in 1395 he acquired many of the adjoining lands by marriage. When the last of the old Earls of Lennox died without male issue, the MacFarlanes claimed the earldom. However, it was finally settled on the Stewarts of Darnley. This led to a long enmity between the MacFarlanes and the Stewarts which only ended when Andrew MacFarlane married a daughter of the Earl of Lennox in the 15th century.<br /> <br /> In the 16th century the MacFarlanes fought alongside the Earls of Lennox in many battles. Duncan MacFarlane fought with the Earl of Lennox at the Battle of Glasgow Muir in 1544 and was later killed at the Battle of Pinkie in 1547. The MacFarlanes fought against Mary Queen of Scots in 1568 at the Battle of Langside, where they boast of having captured three of the queen's standards.<br /> <br /> In the 16th century the MacFarlanes' frequent raids and their association with the MacGregors brought them an unenviable notoriety. Because their raids usually took place on clear nights, the moon came to be known in the Loch Lomond region as 'MacFarlane's Lantern'. By an act passed in 1594, the MacFarlanes were denounced as thieves, robbers and oppressors. In the 17th century the clan name was proscribed and the MacFarlane lands were declared forfeit. Some members of the clan emigrated to Ireland and some to America. Walter, 20th chief, who died in 1767, was one of the most famous antiquarians and genealogists of his time