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TITLE
Murray
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P030
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30881
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuart
Stuarts
James Logan Clanbook
Murray

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

The Clan Murray is said to be descended from Freskin, a Fleming who settled in Scotland and received both Highland and Lowland lands from King David I. His grandson, because of possessions in Moray, became known as William de Moravia. He was the ancestor of the Murrays of Bothwell and Abercairny and several of his sons founded other houses, including the Murrays of Tullibardine. His grandson, William de Moravia, dominus de Bothwell, died without issue in 1293, and was succeeded by his brother, Sir Andrew, the great Scots patriot and supporter of Sir William Wallace. His son, also Sir Andrew, married the King's sister and was Regent of Scotland after the death of Robert the Bruce.

The lands of Tullibardine were acquired by Sir William de Moravia in 1282. Sir William Murray of Tullibardine who succeeded in 1446 had seventeen sons, many of whom founded prominent Murray families. Sir John, 12th of Tullibardine, was created Lord Murray in 1604 and Earl of Tullibardine in 1606. His son William, the 2nd Earl, married the heiress of the Stewart Earls of Atholl, through whom the Atholl earldom passed into the Murray family in 1629.

John, the 1st Murray Earl of Atholl, was a staunch Royalist and his son John strongly supported Charles I. In 1670 he succeeded to the Earldom of Tullibardine and in 1676 he was created Marquis of Atholl. John, 2nd Marquis, was created Duke of Atholl in 1703 and was a bitter opponent of the Union of 1707. When he died in 1724, the dukedom passed to his third son James. His first son had predeceased him and his second son William, Marquis of Tulllibardine, excluded himself from the succession by fighting for the Stewarts in the Jacobite risings. Another brother, Lord George Murray, was the famous Jacobite general of the '45 rebellion.

In 1736 the 2nd Duke of Atholl inherited the sovereignty of the Isle of Man but surrendered this to the government in 1765 for £70,000. The seat of the chiefs of Clan Murray, the Dukes of Atholl, is at Blair Castle in Perthshire

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Murray

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuart; Stuarts; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> The Clan Murray is said to be descended from Freskin, a Fleming who settled in Scotland and received both Highland and Lowland lands from King David I. His grandson, because of possessions in Moray, became known as William de Moravia. He was the ancestor of the Murrays of Bothwell and Abercairny and several of his sons founded other houses, including the Murrays of Tullibardine. His grandson, William de Moravia, dominus de Bothwell, died without issue in 1293, and was succeeded by his brother, Sir Andrew, the great Scots patriot and supporter of Sir William Wallace. His son, also Sir Andrew, married the King's sister and was Regent of Scotland after the death of Robert the Bruce. <br /> <br /> The lands of Tullibardine were acquired by Sir William de Moravia in 1282. Sir William Murray of Tullibardine who succeeded in 1446 had seventeen sons, many of whom founded prominent Murray families. Sir John, 12th of Tullibardine, was created Lord Murray in 1604 and Earl of Tullibardine in 1606. His son William, the 2nd Earl, married the heiress of the Stewart Earls of Atholl, through whom the Atholl earldom passed into the Murray family in 1629.<br /> <br /> John, the 1st Murray Earl of Atholl, was a staunch Royalist and his son John strongly supported Charles I. In 1670 he succeeded to the Earldom of Tullibardine and in 1676 he was created Marquis of Atholl. John, 2nd Marquis, was created Duke of Atholl in 1703 and was a bitter opponent of the Union of 1707. When he died in 1724, the dukedom passed to his third son James. His first son had predeceased him and his second son William, Marquis of Tulllibardine, excluded himself from the succession by fighting for the Stewarts in the Jacobite risings. Another brother, Lord George Murray, was the famous Jacobite general of the '45 rebellion. <br /> <br /> In 1736 the 2nd Duke of Atholl inherited the sovereignty of the Isle of Man but surrendered this to the government in 1765 for £70,000. The seat of the chiefs of Clan Murray, the Dukes of Atholl, is at Blair Castle in Perthshire