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TITLE
Cameron
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P033
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30884
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
Stuart
Stuarts
Jacobite: Jacobites
James Logan Clanbook
Cameron

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

Described as 'fiercer than fierceness itself', the Clan Cameron is reputed to be one of the ancient clans of Scotland. Some attribute the name Cameron to a place-name in Fife; others to a Danish King Camchron; and still others to the Gaelic 'cam-shron' meaning 'crooked nose' or 'crooked hill'.

Whatever its origins, the clan has a long association with Lochaber. It consisted originally of three branches: the MacMartins of Letterfinlay, the MacGillonies of Strone and the MacSorlies of Glen Nevis. The first chief of the combined families was Donald Dubh, born around 1400, who was descended from the MacGillonies of Strone but, through marriage with the MacMartins, brought the federation together.

For a time the Camerons were subject to the Lords of the Isles and fought for them against the King at Harlaw in 1411. Later, however, they defected from the MacDonald cause and a long period of feuds followed.

One of the most famous of all Highland chiefs was Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel, born in 1629 and knighted in 1680. The Camerons were staunch supporters of the Stewarts and Sir Ewen held out stoutly against Cromwell. In 1715, too old for military service, he sent his son and the clan to assist the Earl of Mar. Sir Ewen's grandson Donald, known as 'the Gentle Lochiel', joined Prince Charles in 1745; his name is remembered because of his gallantry and loyalty to the Jacobite cause. He escaped to France and died there in 1748. The family estates were forfeited but were restored in 1784. During World War II Achnacarry Castle, home of the Camerons of Lochiel, was used as a commando training centre

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Cameron

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; Stuart; Stuarts; Jacobite: Jacobites; James Logan Clanbook

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> Described as 'fiercer than fierceness itself', the Clan Cameron is reputed to be one of the ancient clans of Scotland. Some attribute the name Cameron to a place-name in Fife; others to a Danish King Camchron; and still others to the Gaelic 'cam-shron' meaning 'crooked nose' or 'crooked hill'.<br /> <br /> Whatever its origins, the clan has a long association with Lochaber. It consisted originally of three branches: the MacMartins of Letterfinlay, the MacGillonies of Strone and the MacSorlies of Glen Nevis. The first chief of the combined families was Donald Dubh, born around 1400, who was descended from the MacGillonies of Strone but, through marriage with the MacMartins, brought the federation together. <br /> <br /> For a time the Camerons were subject to the Lords of the Isles and fought for them against the King at Harlaw in 1411. Later, however, they defected from the MacDonald cause and a long period of feuds followed.<br /> <br /> One of the most famous of all Highland chiefs was Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel, born in 1629 and knighted in 1680. The Camerons were staunch supporters of the Stewarts and Sir Ewen held out stoutly against Cromwell. In 1715, too old for military service, he sent his son and the clan to assist the Earl of Mar. Sir Ewen's grandson Donald, known as 'the Gentle Lochiel', joined Prince Charles in 1745; his name is remembered because of his gallantry and loyalty to the Jacobite cause. He escaped to France and died there in 1748. The family estates were forfeited but were restored in 1784. During World War II Achnacarry Castle, home of the Camerons of Lochiel, was used as a commando training centre