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TITLE
Lamond
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_82_VOLI_P034
DATE OF IMAGE
1845
PERIOD
1840s
CREATOR
Robert R McIan
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30885
KEYWORDS
highland dress
clans
clan histories
clan events
tartans
James Logan Clanbook
Lamond

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.

Tradition has it that the Lamonds or Lamonts were the most ancient proprietors of Cowal. The founder of the clan is usually described as Fearchar and an early name of the clan was Clan 'ic Fhearchair. It was later named after Laomainn, grandson of Fearchar, who in the early 13th century granted to the monks of Paisley certain lands at Kilmun and Kilfinan in Argyll. In 1456 a John Lamont was Baillie of Cowal. John Lamont of Inveryne was knighted in 1539 and had his lands united into the Barony of Inveryne. His principal seat at this time was Toward Castle, where he entertained Mary Queen of Scots in 1563. The Lamonts were connected by marriage to many of the titled families in Scotland.

The story is told of one Lamont chief who, after killing the son of MacGregor of Glenstrae in a quarrel, went on to claim MacGregor's hospitality. MacGregor gave him protection and escorted him safely home to Cowal. Later, the Lamonts repaid this observance of the laws of hospitality by sheltering the MacGregors when they were outlaws and their name was proscribed by Act of Parliament.

During the period of the Civil War, Sir James Lamont supported the Royalist cause. Several of the Campbell chiefs ravaged the Lamont country, destroying Toward and Ascog Castles, and in 1646 treacherously massacred 200 Lamonts at Dunoon, where a memorial commemorating the event was erected in 1906. The massacre formed one of the charges against the Marquis of Argyle for which he was executed in 1661. The Lamonts' power in Cowal was broken and their possessions were greatly reduced. From this time on, Ardlamont became the seat of the Lamont chiefs

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Lamond

1840s

highland dress; clans; clan histories; clan events; tartans; James Logan Clanbook;

Highland Libraries

The Clans of the Scottish Highlands

James Logan's "The Clans of the Scottish Highlands" was published to celebrate the centenary of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. It was illustrated by Robert R McIan.<br /> <br /> Tradition has it that the Lamonds or Lamonts were the most ancient proprietors of Cowal. The founder of the clan is usually described as Fearchar and an early name of the clan was Clan 'ic Fhearchair. It was later named after Laomainn, grandson of Fearchar, who in the early 13th century granted to the monks of Paisley certain lands at Kilmun and Kilfinan in Argyll. In 1456 a John Lamont was Baillie of Cowal. John Lamont of Inveryne was knighted in 1539 and had his lands united into the Barony of Inveryne. His principal seat at this time was Toward Castle, where he entertained Mary Queen of Scots in 1563. The Lamonts were connected by marriage to many of the titled families in Scotland.<br /> <br /> The story is told of one Lamont chief who, after killing the son of MacGregor of Glenstrae in a quarrel, went on to claim MacGregor's hospitality. MacGregor gave him protection and escorted him safely home to Cowal. Later, the Lamonts repaid this observance of the laws of hospitality by sheltering the MacGregors when they were outlaws and their name was proscribed by Act of Parliament.<br /> <br /> During the period of the Civil War, Sir James Lamont supported the Royalist cause. Several of the Campbell chiefs ravaged the Lamont country, destroying Toward and Ascog Castles, and in 1646 treacherously massacred 200 Lamonts at Dunoon, where a memorial commemorating the event was erected in 1906. The massacre formed one of the charges against the Marquis of Argyle for which he was executed in 1661. The Lamonts' power in Cowal was broken and their possessions were greatly reduced. From this time on, Ardlamont became the seat of the Lamont chiefs